An AC joint separation, also known as an AC joint sprain, is an injury to the ligament that holds the acromioclavicular joint together on the upper part of the shoulder. It typically occurs due to a fall on an extended arm.

AC joint sprains can be classified as a very mild (grade 1) to a severe (grade 6) injury.

It is essential that the patient receives early treatment and support for this surgery to prevent problems in the long run or shoulder deformities.

Thomas & Bigler Knee & Shoulder Institute, led by board-certified orthopedic surgeons Dr. Steven C. Thomas and Dr. Gregory T. Bigler, provides orthopedic treatments to patients in Las Vegas, Nevada and surrounding communities and towns in this area of the nation.  

Symptoms

The symptoms of this condition include pain at the end of the collarbone on the upper part of the shoulder. The pain may extend throughout the shoulder area initially. However, it can become localized to a hard point atop the shoulder later on.

What is an AC Joint Separation?

The AC joint is an acronym for the acromioclavicular joint. The separation of the two bones in this joint occurs due to injury to the ligaments joining them. It is also known as a shoulder separation injury. The acromioclavicular joint comprises the collar (clavicle) bone’s outer end and the acromion process of the shoulder (scapular) blade. The acromion refers to a bony process which projects forward from atop the scapular.

Commonly, the AC joint receives an injury due to landing on the elbow, shoulder, or an outstretched arm. When a person falls, they usually automatically outstretch their arm to break the fall. The force of the fall goes up the wrist and arm to the AC joint.

Treatment

The first aid for an AC joint injury is to apply the principles of PRICE, namely rest, ice, compression, and elevation. This involves the application of ice therapy and a compression wrap to the injured area immediately to address the pain and inflammation. The patient will need to wear a sling to ensure that the shoulder is immobile as well as to reduce the pain by taking the weight off the arm.

A doctor may prescribe anti-inflammatory meds such as ibuprofen to mitigate the pain and swelling. They will also diagnose the injury to ascertain its severity.

In case an injury to the AC joint is not adequately treated, it can cause a lump on top of the shoulder in the long-run. The doctor may use ultrasound for minor injuries. In more severe cases, they may use TENS for relief from pain.

AC Joint Taping

To assist with healing, AC joint taping should be used. This will fix the joint and support it into the right position. The joint may require taping for around two to three weeks.

Firstly, apply two or three 2.5 cm zinc oxide tape strips over the shoulder’s top covering the AC joint. This will offer an anchor for the support strip to connect to. In the next step, pass a support tape strip from the front part of the shoulder and down the side of the arm to apply tension to the tape.

Committed orthopedic surgeons Dr. Thomas and Dr. Bigler receive patients from Las Vegas, Nevada and other towns and cities in The Silver State.

If you would like to schedule an appointment or learn more about the Knee and Shoulder Institute procedures & treatments performed by Las Vegas, Nevada board-certified surgeons Steven C. Thomas, MD and Gregory T. Bigler, MD. Contact the office today click here.

Dislocated Shoulder

A dislocated shoulder is a traumatic and painful injury, typically caused due to a fall or during contact sports. In a dislocated shoulder condition, the upper arm bone will move away from its normal position along with damage to the surrounding muscles, tendons and ligaments.

A shoulder dislocated requires prompt medical attention. A full rehabilitation program is essential if the athlete is to avoid re-injuring the shoulder. Profound, dedicated, and board certified orthopedic surgeons at the Bigler Knee & Shoulder Institute provide treatments for dislocated shoulder to patients in Las Vegas, Nevada, and surrounding communities.

Symptoms

The patient will experience sudden severe pain at the time of injury. Bruising and swelling will develop later. The patient may feel the shoulder is popping out of the joint and the injured side will often look different or slightly lower than the other side. The patient will typically avoid moving or turning the arm outwards. If any nerve or blood vessel damage has occurred, the patient may experience a sensation of pins and needles, numbness or discoloration through the arm to the hand.

Causes

A dislocated shoulder is often caused by a fall onto an outstretched arm, twisting or impact to the shoulder. The dislocation takes place when the head of the humerus bone pops out of the shoulder joint.

They are usually either posterior where the head of the upper arm bone or humerus dislocates out of the back of the joint or more commonly anterior where it pops out forwards. The large range of movement available in the shoulder joint makes it particularly vulnerable to injury.

Treatment

To protect the shoulder joint from further damage, once an injury occurs, the patient should not move the shoulder joint. If possible, the shoulder should be immobilized in a sling. Ice packs can be used to improve pain and swelling. Ice therapy can be repeated every hour initially.

Reduction

Reduction is a form of treatment that involves putting the dislocated humerus bone back into the joint. Reduction should only be performed by a fully trained medical professional. The orthopedic surgeon may seek an x-ray before reduction to rule out any small fractures. For active adults below the age of 30, reduction can be a very effective solution for shoulder dislocation.

Immobilization

The shoulder is typically immobilized in a sling in medial rotation with the arm across the body until the tissues have healed. Mobility and strength of the shoulder will be restored after a comprehensive rehab process. The shoulder may be immobilized in a string for a week following a reduction. In case of severe tissue damage, the duration of immobilization may be longer.

Surgery

If the shoulder dislocation recurs, or if the bones are fractured, the patient may require surgery. Surgery should ideally be performed as soon as possible after the injury. Several surgical techniques can be used to treat shoulder dislocation. The choice of technique will depend primarily on the patient’s lifestyle and activity.

Board certified orthopedic surgeons Dr. Steven Thomas and Dr. Gregory Bigler provide shoulder dislocation treatments to patients in Las Vegas, Nevada, and other cities and towns in The Battle Born State.

If you would like to schedule an appointment or learn more about the Knee and Shoulder Institute procedures & treatments performed by Las Vegas, Nevada board certified surgeons Steven C. Thomas, MD and Gregory T. Bigler, MD. Contact the office today click here.

Rotator Cuff Strain

A tear to any of the four rotator cuff muscles in the shoulder is called a rotator cuff strain or tear. The injury is common in throwing and racket sports, and may range from mild to severe. The job of the rotator cuff is to rotate the arm at the shoulder and provider support around the joint.

Treatment in case of rotator cuff tears will begin by reducing pain and inflammation, followed by a comprehensive rehabilitation program including mobility and specific exercises to strength the muscles. Salient, dependable, and board certified orthopedic surgeons at the Thomas & Bigler Knee & Shoulder Institute provide treatments for rotator cuff tears to patients in Las Vegas, Nevada and surrounding locations in this area of the southwest.

Symptoms

Symptoms of a rotator cuff tear will include sudden pain in the shoulder, which may be accompanied by a feeling of tearing. The pain may radiate down into the arm.

Signs of shoulder impingement may occur where the tendon pinches between the ball and socket of the shoulder joint when moving the arm out over head height. Pain may worsen over time and weakness in the shoulder may progress to a point where the patient is unable to lift the arm up to the side.

PRICE Therapy

The basic first aid for a rotator cuff tear in the muscle or tendon involves rest and application of PRICE principles – protection, rest, ice, compression, and elevation. Ice or cold therapy should be applied quickly to stop the swelling, inflammation and pain from worsening. The patient can use ice therapy for 10 minutes every hour, reducing it to three to four times a day as pain mitigates.

For more severe rotator cuff injuries, a sling can sometimes be more useful. Once the acute phase has passed, the patient can begin mobility and strengthening exercises as long as no pain occurs. If the PRICE efforts do not help to eliminate the pain and restore the shoulder movement, the patient will require professional medical treatment.

Orthopedic Treatment

To start with, an orthopedic surgeon may prescribe pain relief and anti-inflammatory drugs to address a rotator cuff tear. The surgeon may order imaging studies such as x-rays or MRI to determine the exact diagnosis and rule out a fracture. Some patients may have to receive a steroid injection directly into the site of the problem to help improve inflammation and enable the patient to proceed with rehabilitation.

Once the pain is eliminated, the surgeon will recommend a full rehabilitation program including stretching and strengthening exercises. Shoulder massage, including cross friction massage, to the rotator cuff tendon can break the injury down to its acute stage to allow correct healing of the injury to occur.

Range of motion and mobility exercises in the shoulder joint should start as soon as these can be performed without any pain. The first priority is pendulum exercises, particularly if it is a severe tear or following surgery. Stellar, committed, and board certified orthopedic surgeons Dr. Steven Thomas and Dr. Gregory Bigler receive patients from Las Vegas, Nevada and nearby areas in this part of southeast Nevada for rotator cuff injury treatments and surgery.

If you would like to schedule an appointment or learn more about the Knee and Shoulder Institute procedures & treatments performed by Las Vegas, Nevada board certified surgeons Steven C. Thomas, MD and Gregory T. Bigler, MD. Contact the office today click here.

Acute Shoulder InjuriesAn acute shoulder injury may occur due to sudden direct impact on the shoulder joint, overuse or overstretching of the shoulder muscle, tendon or ligament, or twisting of the shoulder joint.

Board certified orthopedic surgeons Dr. Steven Thomas and Dr. Gregory Bigler provides acute shoulder treatments to patients in Las Vegas, Nevada and surrounding locations.

Typical Injury Occurrence

Acute shoulder injuries occur frequently due to a fall onto an outstretched arm or overstretching or overloading or through direct impact. Most often, the athlete will experience a sudden sharp pain along with discomfort and mobility loss.

At times, there will be inflammation and swelling. It is vital to treat acute shoulder injuries right away using the PRICE principles of immediate first aid. Ensure that you seek the advice of a medical professional in case of severe pain or you have any concerns about the condition.

Rotator Cuff Strain

A rotator cuff strain means a tear to any of the four rotator cuff muscles in the shoulder. This condition occurs commonly in patients participating in throwing and racket sports. Such tears can be categorized from mild to severe. The treatment initially focuses on the reduction of pain and swelling. After that, the patient undergoes a complete rehabilitation program which involves mobility and strengthening along with sports specific exercises.

Dislocated Shoulder

A dislocated shoulder refers to a traumatic and painful injury that frequently occurs due to a fall or contact sports.

The patient should seek immediate medical assistance. In this injury, the upper arm bone dislocates out of its regular position in the shoulder joint which results in major damage to the soft tissues. It is crucial for the athlete to undergo a complete rehabilitation program to prevent a re-injury to the shoulder.

AC Joint Sprain

An AC joint separation or sprain implies an injury to the ligaments that hold the acromioclavicular joint at the top of the shoulder. It typically occurs due to a fall onto an outstretched arm. Such injuries range from a very mild (Grade 1) to a very severe (Grade 6) injuries. It is important for the patient to seek immediate first aid and treatment to avoid deformity and problems in the long-run.

Clavical Fracture

A clavicle fracture or broken collarbone is also called a fracture of the clavicle bone. This bone runs along the front of the shoulder to the breastbone or sternum in the middle of the chest.

Such fractures result from a fall onto an outstretched arm or the shoulder itself. The primary symptom is pain along the collarbone. This pain may be very severe. There may be inflammation in the area along with a bony deformity which may be felt.

First-Aid Treatment

The P.R.I.C.E. therapy, which is based on the principles of protection, rest, ice, compression, and elevation, should be used in the treatment of all acute shoulder injuries. The patient should apply these principles at home, at least for the initial two to three days. These principles are as follows:

  • Protection – Protect the injury from any more damage.
  • Rest – Avoid using the arm or elbow.
  • Ice – Applying ice or cold therapy topically to the injury area can help in decreasing the pain and inflammation.
  • Compression – Using compression support for the arm or elbow may help decrease swelling.
  • Elevation – An upper arm sling can help in proper elevation.

Board certified plastic surgeons at the Thomas & Bigler Knee and Shoulder Institute receive patients from Las Vegas, Nevada and nearby areas for the treatment of acute shoulder injuries.

If you would like to schedule an appointment or learn more about the Knee and Shoulder Institute procedures & treatments performed by Las Vegas, Nevada board certified surgeons Steven C. Thomas, MD and Gregory T. Bigler, MD. Contact the office today click here.

What is a deltoid contusion?The deltoid muscle is a significant muscle on the shoulder, and it has three parts: the anterior, posterior and the middle. This muscle enables the arm to lift sideways.

The front portion facilitates in lifting the arm up forward which is known as shoulder flexion. The back portion allows the arm to lift up backward which is known as shoulder extension. In case the deltoid muscle suffers an injury or strain, it may lead to pain at the side, back or front of the shoulder.

A deltoid contusion refers to a bruise in the deltoid muscle which is located on the shoulder’s side. This condition results from a direct muscle impact, typically from a blunt object or someone’s elbow.

Board certified orthopedic surgeons Dr. Steven Thomas and Dr. Gregory Bigler provide deltoid contusion treatments to patients in Las Vegas, Nevada and other towns and suburbs in this region of the southwest.

Symptoms

The symptoms of a deltoid contusion may include:

  • Severe pain in the muscle after impact
  • Pain and discomfort when raising the arm to the side
  • Tenderness in the muscle
  • Bruising
  • Possible inflammation

Treatment

Grade 1 Deltoid Strain

The patient should apply ice therapy and compression wrap frequently for 15 minutes in one sitting, for the initial 24 hours post-injury. They should undertake light exercises as advised by the orthopedic surgeon to slowly regain weight and strength in the muscle. Ultrasound therapy or professional sports massage may help speed up the recovery.

Grade 2 Deltoid Strain

The patient should apply ice for 3 to 5 days. After that, they should apply heat using hot baths, hot water bottle or ultrasound therapy. The patient can consult a sports injury specialist for a comprehensive rehabilitation plan. After the initial week, the patient will need to undertake light, pain-free exercises.

The patient may also be advised to undertake cycling and stretching exercises. The patient may also consider receiving a sports massage from a sports therapist to expedite the recovery. They may slowly resume sports activities after a period of 2 weeks.

Grade 3 Deltoid Strain

In this case, the patient should immediately seek medical assistance and apply PRICE therapy. The patient can perform painless static contraction from the 2nd week. They can apply heat using a hot bath, hot water bottle, or ultrasound. The 3rd week can involve all these activities as well as an increase in the intensity of the static contraction.

Starting from the 4th week, the patient can undertake rotator cuff exercises and light lateral raises, stretching exercises and cycling are instructed by the surgeon.

The fifth week will involve building up exercises. After that, the patient may slowly start sports specific exercises. The patient will experience a speedier recovery if the surgeon or sports therapist uses sports massage, electrical stimulation or ultrasound.

In case traditional treatments are unable to provide adequate healing of the deltoid muscle, then the patient may require surgery. The patient should seek immediate medical attention if they suspect a grade 2 or 3 injury. Also check for neural symptoms such as numbness, tingling, and weakness in the hand or arm which may be an indication of nerve damage.

Thomas & Bigler Knee and Shoulder Institute, led by board-certified orthopedic surgeons, provides deltoid contusion fracture treatments to patients in Las Vegas, Nevada and other cities and neighborhoods in this area of the country.

If you would like to schedule an appointment or learn more about the Knee and Shoulder Institute procedures & treatments performed by Las Vegas, Nevada board certified surgeons Steven C. Thomas, MD and Gregory T. Bigler, MD. call (702)

Clavicle FractureA clavicle fracture or broken collarbone, also known as a fracture of the clavicle bone, runs along the front of the shoulder to the breastbone or sternum in the middle of the chest.

Board certified orthopedic surgeons Dr. Steven Thomas and Dr. Gregory Bigler provide clavicle fracture treatments to patients in Las Vegas, Nevada and surrounding communities.

What is Clavicle?

The clavicle or collarbone refers to the bone that runs along the front of the shoulder to the breastbone or sternum at the front of the chest. It typically gets fractured because of a hard fall onto the shoulder itself or an outstretched arm or due to a collision with an adversary in a contact sport such as American Football or Rugby.

There is a higher possibility of injury if the playing surface is hard.

The bone typically fractures in its middle third. This condition is quite painful. The outer portion of the bone frequently gets pushed down with the inside portion displaced upwards.

In nearly 15 percent of injuries, a distal clavicle fracture occurs where the bone fractures nearer to the shoulder at the acromioclavicular joint. Such fractures have an extended recovery period and have a chance of nonunion.

Symptoms

This type of fracture typically occurs due to a fall onto an outstretched arm or the shoulder. The primary symptom of a clavicle fracture is a pain in the collarbone, which may be extreme. The patient may experience inflammation over the region, and a deformity of the bone may be felt.

The patient should seek immediate medical assistance if they suspect a broken collarbone. The surgeon will confirm the fracture using an x-ray. They will then immobilize the arm with a sling or collar, bandage, and cuff.

Surgical Treatment

A clavicle fracture surgery involves placing the broken bone fragments back into position and disallowing them from moving out till the fracture heals completely. After the patient recovers, this will help strengthen the shoulder.

Open Reduction and Internal Fixation is a standard surgery for the treatment of clavicle fractures. Firstly, the surgeon will reposition or reduce the fragments of the bone to their natural alignment. Subsequently, they will use special material hardware to ensure that the fragments of the bone are held in place. The Common internal fixation techniques involve plates and screws.

The surgeon attaches special screws and metal plates to the outer surface of the bone to hold the bone pieces in place after they are reduced into their normal alignment. After the surgery, the patient may experience a small patch of numb skin beneath the incision. This will become less noticeable after some time. It is possible that the patient may feel the plate from beneath the skin.

The plates and screws typically remain in their position even after recovery if the patient does not experience discomfort in the collarbone region. Sometimes the surgeon may use pins rather than plates to hold the fracture in place after the ends of the bone have been aligned.

Thomas & Bigler Knee and Shoulder Institute, led by board certified orthopedic surgeons, provides clavicle fracture treatments to patients in Las Vegas, Nevada and nearby areas.

If you would like to schedule an appointment or learn more about the Knee and Shoulder Institute procedures & treatments performed by Las Vegas, Nevada board certified surgeons Steven C. Thomas, MD and Gregory T. Bigler, MD. call (702)

Describing a Scapula FractureA scapula fracture refers to a break in the shoulder blade bone at the back of the shoulder. This type of injury is quite rare, accounting for just one percent of all fractures.

Board certified orthopedic surgeons Dr. Steven Thomas and Dr. Gregory Bigler provide scapula fracture treatments to patients in Las Vegas, Nevada and surrounding locations across the horizon.

Symptoms

Symptoms of a broken shoulder blade would include a sudden pain in the back of the shoulder during the impact as well as rapid inflammation. The patient will feel pain if they attempt to move the upper back or shoulder. The patient will also struggle to lift their arms to their head height. They will feel tenderness, especially over the shoulder blade.

Causes

The patient can experience a scapula fracture or broken shoulder blade if there is a direct impact to the scapula from a blunt article, or due to a fall onto the shoulder or arm. A common cause of this injury is car accidents.

Treatment Approach

Patients should seek prompt medical attention if they fear a scapula fracture. The surgeon may use an x-ray to confirm the fracture and understand how extensive the injury or displacement is. The surgeon will also examine the patient to check for symptoms of vascular or neural injury such as tingling, numbness, weakness or a slower pulse in the arm.

An experienced orthopedic surgeon will treat a scapula fracture conservatively and try to avoid surgery. In this condition, bone displacement is rare as the muscles hold the two (or multiple) parts firmly together.

The surgeon may decide to immobilize the arm in a sling to decrease the arm’s weight on the shoulder. The patient will be recommended to perform early range of motion exercises to maintain movement and avoid stiffness.

A majority of scapular fractures heal in nearly six weeks. After the patient feels pain-free, they can use strengthening exercises restore their total strength and maintain healthy patterns of movement at the shoulder. If the patient’s bone fractures in multiple pieces or there is a significant displacement in the bones, then they may need surgery to fix the scapula back together via pins or wires.

Surgical Treatment

The patient may require surgery if they experience the following kinds of shoulder blade fractures:

  • Fractures of the glenoid articular surface with bone displacement
  • Fractures of the scalpular neck with substantial angulation
  • Fractures of the acromion process that results in the impingement syndrome

During the surgery, the surgeon will initially reposition the bone fragments in their normal alignment.  They will then help the fragments hold together by attaching metal plates with special screws to the outer surface of the bone.

After the surgical procedure, the patient will undergo a period of rehab to enable a safe and healthy recovery of the treated shoulder.

Pain Management

The surgeon will prescribe pain meds for short-term relief after the shoulder blade injury or for a brief duration post-surgery. The surgeon may prescribe a combination of medications such as NSAIDs, Opioids, and local anesthetics for pain management. They will minimize the requirement for opioids as they can become addictive.

Thomas & Bigler Knee and Shoulder Institute, led by board-certified orthopedic surgeons, provides scapula fracture treatments to patients in Las Vegas, Nevada and other towns and cities in The Sagebrush State.

If you would like to schedule an appointment or learn more about the Knee and Shoulder Institute procedures & treatments performed by Las Vegas, Nevada board certified surgeons Steven C. Thomas, MD and Gregory T. Bigler, MD. call (702)

Knowing All About a Supraspinatus RuptureThe supraspinatus muscle is located along the shoulder blade’s top part and inserts at the top of the humerus bone. It is among the four rotator cuff muscles in the body and is used for lifting the arm up sideways. It is also used significantly for participating in throwing sports because the muscle holds the arm in the shoulder joint when an athlete makes a throw.

After a throwing movement, a strong force is needed to slow down the arm. However, people rarely make an effort to train their supraspinatus muscles. Therefore, a heavy fall on the shoulder can lead to a muscle injury to the tendon.

Outstanding, perspicacious, and board-certified orthopedic surgeons at the Thomas & Bigler Knee & Shoulder Institute provide treatments for supraspinatus fracture to patients in Las Vegas, Nevada, and surrounding communities in The Battle Born State.

Symptoms

A supraspinatus tear is characterized by a sharp shoulder pain during the time of injury. It is accompanied by pain in the arm when it is rotated upward and outward. A patient can also feel more pain and weakness when raising the arm sideways at a 60 degree arc.

Treatment

An athlete who has sustained a supraspinatus injury should apply ice. Ice should not be applied directly on the skin, and should be wrapped in a wet towel to prevent ice burns. A patient can apply ice for 15 minutes every two hours for the first two days after the injury. The frequency for ice therapy can be gradually decreased over a few days. A patient should continue to rest until the pain subsides.

The orthopedic surgeon will usually recommend complete shoulder rest by immobilizing it in a sling, or something similar, for a partial rupture. A patient should consult a sports injury specialist who can advise the best way to go forward with treatment and rehabilitation.

In case of a complete rupture, it may be necessary to undergo a surgery. The surgeon may also recommend an invasive treatment if the conservative approach fails to contain the symptoms.

The success of the surgery will depend on the severity of the injury, the condition of the muscle and the extent of the tear. The surgery will be performed with the help of an arthroscope, which is a device with a miniature camera fixed to it.

The instrument is inserted in the shoulder through a small incision to observe the internal structures to examine the damage. Once the surgeon can identify the cause and extent of damage, they can repair it in a less invasive and more targeted way.

Research studies have shown that supraspinatus ruptures can heal in about 75 percent of the cases. It takes around six months for the patient to fully recover and resume their normal activities. The patient should diligently follow the surgeon’s instructions during both pre- and post-treatment phases in order to achieve safe and sustainable results.

Board certified orthopedic surgeons Dr. Steven Thomas and Dr. Gregory Bigler receive patients from Las Vegas, Nevada, and other suburbs and communities in this part of the country for the treatment of a full or partial suprasinatus rupture.

If you would like to schedule an appointment or learn more about the Knee and Shoulder Institute procedures & treatments performed by Las Vegas, Nevada board certified surgeons Steven C. Thomas, MD and Gregory T. Bigler, MD. call (702) 933-9393; Physical Therapy (702) 933-9393.

Fracture of the Neck of the HumerusA direct impact on the shoulder or falling onto an outstretched hand can lead to a fractured neck of the humerus. It is a bone that is located at the top of the arm, which forms the glenohumeral joint after fitting into shoulder socket or glenoid.

The humerus neck is at the top of the bone and a break in it results in a fracture, which can happen to an elderly person as well as younger people and children for a variety of reasons. Slipping and falling is a common reason. Tripping over something and hitting the ground with force can cause this injury to occur. Many times children fall off some bars they are playing on or fall out of a tree they are climbing and experience this type of injury.

Honorable, pragmatic, and board-certified orthopedic surgeons at the Thomas & Bigler Knee & Shoulder Institute provide treatments for humerus fracture to patients in Las Vegas, Nevada, and surrounding locations in The Sagebrush State.

Treatment

A fracture that has more than two fragments, such as those with a displacement over 1 cm or leading to shoulder dislocation usually requires a surgery.

An orthopedic surgeon will treat a displaced fracture more conservatively, and try to avoid surgery. Such fractures heal quickly and the patient is asked to wear a broad arm sling. They are best treated with a cuff and collar that allows gravity to rectify any angulation or misalignment.

The surgeon will advise the patient to keep the arm, which is in a sling, underneath the clothes for extra protection for the first two weeks. After two weeks, the patient will be prescribed shoulder joint pendular exercises.

From the fourth week onwards, the patient is allowed to wear the cuff and collar outside the clothes. Gradually, as the arm improves over the next two weeks, the cuff and collar are taken off.

Non-Surgical Treatment

Immobilization

The patient is made to wear a sling to provide arm immobilization and support. Another option is to use a swathe, which offers added support and reduces movement further as it is wrapped horizontally around the arm and chest.

The surgeon will usually prescribe arm immobilization for around two to three weeks. But the duration can vary depending on the patient’s medical condition, age, and fracture type.

Pain Management

A patient will be prescribed pain medications and anti-inflammatory drugs like ibuprofen during the healing process.

Range of Motion Exercises

The patient will be required to perform specific ROM exercises, but only after 7 to 10 days of sustaining the injury.

Physical Therapy

The surgeon may recommend physical therapy after 2 to 3 weeks of the injury.

Surgical Treatment

A broken proximal humerus will have to be surgically replaced or repaired. A surgeon may secure the bone pieces together with the help of screws, plates, and nails. If the surgery cannot repair the impacted bone, then the shoulder ball may have to be replaced during the surgery.

Surgery is usually recommended for fractures that involve rotator cuff attachments, displaced fractures in younger patients, cases where there is a head-split fracture in the humerus, injuries involving nerves and blood vessels, open fractures, or dislocated fractures.Awesome board certified orthopedic surgeons Dr. Steven Thomas and Dr. Gregory Bigler receive patients from Las Vegas, Nevada, and other towns and suburbs in this part of the state for the treatment of a fractured neck of the humerus.

If you would like to schedule an appointment or learn more about the Knee and Shoulder Institute procedures & treatments performed by Las Vegas, Nevada board certified surgeons Steven C. Thomas, MD and Gregory T. Bigler, MD. call (702) 933-9393; Physical Therapy (702) 933-9393.

Defining a Pec Major Tendon Strain (Rupture)The pectoralis muscle, which is located at the front of the chest, is a large and strong muscle that rotates the arm inward. The muscle’s weak point is the tendon where it is attached to the arm bone. It is the point that is likely to get ruptured during weight training activities, such as a bench press.

Cordial, innovative, and board certified orthopedic surgeons at the Thomas & Bigler Knee & Shoulder Institute provide treatments for pec major tendon strain or rupture to patients in Las Vegas, Nevada, and surrounding locations across the landscape.

Symptoms

A pec major tendon sprain is characterized by a sudden and sharp pain at the upper arm’s front part, near the shoulder, where the pec major tendon is attached. The strain is accompanied by a rapid swelling of the upper arm and the front of the shoulder.

An orthopedic surgeon will diagnose the injury by reproducing the pain to confirm the cause. It is done by making the patient pull their arm across the front of the chest or rotate the arm inward against resistance. There is also a noticeable lump or gap in the muscle.

Treatment

An athlete who gets a pec major tendon sprain should follow the principle of R.I.C.E, which is rest, ice, compression, and elevation, for a minimum of two days after the injury. The patient should apply ice for 10 to 15 minutes every hour and decrease the application as the symptoms gradually diminish.

A patient should also consult a sports injury specialist. If the tendon is fully ruptured, then the surgeon will recommend a surgery, followed by a long duration of rest and a subsequent full rehabilitation program. Applying a sports massage to the injured area can also help in healing the injury after the acute stage.

Repairing a Torn Pectoral Tendon

Patients undergoing a surgery to repair the pec tendon tear should how it may be repaired.

Type 1 Tear

It is simple to repair these kinds of tears where the tendon is torn off the bone. It involves an open surgery where an incision is placed into the patient’s axilla.

Surgeons will use a suture anchor device during the open surgery to fit the sutures into the bone, which will then be used to attach the tendon back to the bone. The patient will be in a sling for a relatively longer duration to ensure enough healing before starting on strengthening exercises.

Type 2 Tear

A surgeon will wait until some early repair scar tissue has formed on the pec muscle because this makes a rather difficult repair easier to carry out. Surgeons can sometimes use the cadaver tendon to strengthen or augment the repair.

Type 3 Tear

These tears occur rarely, and mostly within the muscle. They are hard to repair and the surgeon may wait for a couple of weeks so that scar tissue can form and facilitate the repair process.

Terrific, perceptive, and board certified orthopedic surgeons Dr. Steven Thomas and Dr. Gregory Bigler receive patients from Las Vegas, Nevada, and other neighborhoods and cities in this region of the southwest for the treatment of pec major tendon strain or rupture.

If you would like to schedule an appointment or learn more about the Knee and Shoulder Institute procedures & treatments performed by Las Vegas, Nevada board certified surgeons Steven C. Thomas, MD and Gregory T. Bigler, MD. call (702) 933-9393; Physical Therapy (702) 933-9393.