Inside Knee Pain

Inside knee pain or medial knee pain refers to the pain that may occur on the inside of the knee. As opposed to a sudden acute knee injury, this pain usually emerges gradually. In many cases, the patient may not be sure of what this injury may be, and they should be aware of its common symptoms.

Although pain on the inside of the knee is often caused due to an acute injury occurring as a result of sudden trauma, but it can appear gradually over time with overuse and poor biomechanics. The orthopedic surgeon will first evaluate the underlying cause of the medial knee injury and assess its severity in order to recommend an appropriate treatment.

The Thomas & Bigler Knee & Shoulder Institute, led by board certified orthopedic surgeons, provides state of the art treatments for medial knee injury and various other procedures to patients in Las Vegas, Nevada, and surrounding communities and suburbs in this region of the Battle Born State.

Osteoarthritis of the Knee

Osteoarthritis of the knee or wear and tear on the knee joint is one of the common causes of inside knee pain. A customized pain management program and therapy may be recommended by the surgeon to patients suffering from this condition.

Synovial Plica Irritation

The synovial plica refers to a synovial fold that is present along the inside of the knee cap. This can become the cause of discomfort and pain for a patient. In some cases, this pain may be misdiagnosed or confused with patellofemoral pain syndrome because the symptoms are quite similar.

Pes Anserine Tendinopathy – Bursitis

Pes anserine tendonitis refers to inflammation of a tendon on the inside of the knee. A small fluid sac or bursa can also become inflamed and cause pain.

Medial Ligament Sprain

An MCL injury or a medial ligament sprain refers to a tear of the ligament on the inside of the knee. This typically occurs because of twisting or direct impact. Injuries of the medial ligament are common in contact sports as well as martial arts. These injuries may sometimes occur even in everyday life through twists and falls of the knee joint. A severe MCL sprain may also occur with a cartilage meniscus tear.

Medial Cartilage Meniscus Injury

A torn meniscus refers to a tear that may occur in the semi circular cartilage in the knee joint. It can create pain on the inside of the knee. Contact sports, direct impact or twisting are common causes of this injury, but older athletes may also suffer from this condition through gradual degeneration. Treatment will depend on the severity of the injury, and may sometimes require surgery.

Knee Contusion

A bruised knee, which is clinically called a knee contusion, may occur due to an impact on the inside of the knee. This injury particularly occurs when the knee hits against something hard, such as a club or a ball. A contusion or a bruise may sometimes involve damage to any of the soft tissues or bone.

Sagacious, tremendous, and board certified orthopedic surgeons Dr. Steven Thomas and Dr. Gregory Bigler receive patients from Las Vegas, Nevada, and other cities and communities across the landscape for medial knee injuries.

If you would like to schedule an appointment or learn more about the Knee and Shoulder Institute procedures & treatments performed by Las Vegas, Nevada board certified surgeons Steven C. Thomas, MD and Gregory T. Bigler, MD. call (702) 933-9393; Physical Therapy (702) 933-9393.

Front Knee Pain 

Front or anterior knee pain refers to the pain occurring at the front of the knee, including the kneecap or patella. Patients may not be sure what is causing them front knee pain, but two of the common causes of this pain are patellofemoral pain and patella tendinitis or Jumper’s knee.

It can sometimes become difficult to distinguish between the two types of pain, and on occasion, these two conditions may occur at the same time. Fabulous, focused, and board certified orthopedic surgeons at the Thomas & Bigler Knee & Shoulder Institute provide treatments for anterior knee pain to patients in Las Vegas, Nevada, and surrounding locations in this area of the country.

Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome

Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome (PFPS) is also known by other names such as as runners knee, chondromalacia patellae, anterior knee pain and patellofemoral joint syndrome. This generic term describes patella pain at the front of the knee.

Sinding-Larsen-Johansson Lesion

Sinding-Larsen-Johansson Lesion or syndrome is one of a group of injuries known as osteochondroses. This condition typically causes knee pain in children. Osgood’s Schlatter Disease is another similar injury. It is a chronic stress injury occurring at the bottom of the kneecap.

Jumpers Knee

Jumpers knee or patellar tendonitis occurs from overuse of the knee. It causes pain in the front of the knee, localized at a point towards the lower part of the kneecap. Too much running, jumping, or repetitive strain can cause inflammation or degeneration of the patella tendon.

Osgood Schlatters Disease

Osgood Schlatter disease or Osgood Schlatter lesion is a knee pain commonly occurring in children in the age group of 10 to 15 years. The condition was named after two physicians in 1903, Dr. Robert Osgood and Dr. Carl Schlatter.

Chondromalacia Patella

Chondromalacia patella (CMP) refers to damage occurring to the articular cartilage, which is the smooth hard cartilage under the kneecap.

Housemaids Knee

Housemaids Knee, clinically known as prepatellar bursitis or knee bursitis, refers to a swelling of the bursa. A small sack of fluid may occur at the front of the knee.

Patellofemoral Instability

In case of patellofemoral instability, the patient typically experiences the sensation of their kneecap giving away or feeling loose on movement of the knee.

Quadriceps Tendinopathy

Pain and inflammation of the quadriceps tendon may occur due to overuse of the knee. The tendon inserts into the top of the kneecap, and over a period of time it can result in degeneration of the tendon.

Infrapatella Bursitis

A bursa refers to a small sac of fluid, which performs the function of lubricating the movement between tendons and bone. Several bursas are present around the knee, which can sometimes become painful and inflamed.

Fat Pad Impingement

The infrapatella fat pad is also known as Hoffa’s pad. It is a soft tissue that lies beneath the kneecap which can get impinged causing knee pain.

When a patient experiences persistent or severe knee pain, they should consult with an orthopedic surgeon and receive appropriate treatment. Judicious, accomplished, and board certified orthopedic surgeons Dr. Steven Thomas and Dr. Gregory Bigler receive patients from Las Vegas, Nevada, and other suburbs and communities in this area of Nevada for knee and shoulder related injuries.

If you would like to schedule an appointment or learn more about the Knee and Shoulder Institute procedures & treatments performed by Las Vegas, Nevada board certified surgeons Steven C. Thomas, MD and Gregory T. Bigler, MD. call (702) 933-9393; Physical Therapy (702) 933-9393.

Knee Injuries

A sudden twisting action or trauma may sometimes lead to an acute knee injury. Treatment is essential to prevent the acute knee injury from progressing to chronic or more complex knee injuries. Board certified orthopedic surgeons at Thomas & Bigler Knee & Shoulder Institute provide treatments for acute knee injuries to patients in Las Vegas, Nevada, and surrounding communities in The Sagebrush State.

ACL Sprain

Anterior Cruciate Ligament injury or ACL may commonly occur in contact sports. ACL tears often occur along with damage to other structures within the knee, such as the cartilage or collateral ligaments.

Hamstring Tendon Rupture

If the hamstring tendons insert into the back of the knee, it can cause a full or partial rupture of the tendons.

Medial Ligament Sprain

A medial ligament sprain or MCL injury involves torn ligament inside the knee, often due to direct impact or a twist. These injuries can occur in contact sports as well as in everyday life through falls and twists of the knee joint.

Lateral Knee Ligament Sprain

This involves a knee ligament tear on the outside of the knee. The most likely cause is a direct blow to the inside of the knee.

Posterior Cruciate Ligament Injury

The posterior cruciate ligament is vital to provide stability to the knee and prevent it from bending back the wrong way.

Knee Contusion

This refers to a bruised knee, which may occur due to a fall directly onto the knee or something hard hitting the knee. Treatment will vary depending on the severity of the bruise.

Medial Meniscus Tear

A torn meniscus is a tear to the semi circular cartilage in the knee joint. This injury commonly occurs through direct impact in contact sports or twisting. Severe tears may require surgery.

Unhappy Triad

The unhappy triad of the knee refers to a severe injury involving damage to three of the four major knee ligaments.

Coronary Ligament Sprain

The symptoms of this injury are similar to that of cartilage meniscus injury. The symptoms often occur in conjunction with lateral ligament injuries.

Biceps Femoris Tendon Avulsion

The Biceps Femoris is one of the three hamstring muscles. A fracture involves the tendon pulling away from the bone.

Acute Patella Injury

An injury to the kneecap or patella from a fall onto the knee or a direct blow may cause this condition. Sometimes a fracture of the patella may also occur.

Osteochondral Knee Fracture

An Osteochondral knee fracture involves a tear of the cartilage which covers the end of a bone within a joint. This injury typically occurs in association with other injuries such as ACL tears.

Knee Sprain

If an injury or damage occurs to one of the four ligaments that support the knee, it is called a knee sprain.

Articular Cartilage Injury

Damage to the cartilage that lines the bone ends is known as an articular cartilage injury.

Dislocated Knee

When the femur or thigh bone and the tibia or shin bone are moved apart, it called a dislocated knee.

Patella Dislocation

The patella can dislocate outside of its normal position, usually round the outside of the knee.

Sagacious, stellar, and board certified orthopedic surgeons Dr. Steven Thomas and Dr. Gregory Bigler receive patients from Las Vegas, Nevada and nearby areas for treatment of knee injuries.

If you would like to schedule an appointment or learn more about the Knee and Shoulder Institute procedures & treatments performed by Las Vegas, Nevada board certified surgeons Steven C. Thomas, MD and Gregory T. Bigler, MD. call (702) 933-9393; Physical Therapy (702) 933-9393.

Pain Behind the Knee (Posterior)

Posterior knee pain refers to the pain occurring at the back of the knee. This pain may occur due to a number of causes, and appropriate treatment can be provided once the underlying cause is determined. Biceps femoris tendonitis (hamstring tendonitis) is considered to be the most common injury arising out of overuse, and resulting in pain at the back of the knee.

Different causes of swelling are also likely to contribute to posterior knee pain. Timely treatment can help to prevent serious complications in this injury. Board certified orthopedic surgeons at the Thomas & Bigler Knee & Shoulder Institute provide cutting edge treatments for posterior knee pain to patients in Las Vegas, Nevada, and surrounding communities in this part of The Sagebrush State.

Gastrocnemius Tendinopathy or Tendinitis

This condition relates to inflammation or degeneration of the tendon of the calf muscle, which becomes the cause for the pain at the back of the knee. This is an overuse injury, commonly occurring among sprinters and runners.

Biceps Femoris

The biceps femoris tendon is one of the hamstring muscle tendons. If this tendon gets injured, it will lead to pain on the outside, back part of the knee.

Baker’s Cyst

A Baker’s Cyst or Popliteal cyst refers to a significant swelling occurring at the back of the knee. An underlying injury or condition of the knee joint will usually cause this swelling.

Tennis Leg

Pain in the leg, which may caused by a tear of the inner head of the big calf muscle, or the plantaris muscle, or both, is commonly described as a Tennis leg.

Posterolateral Corner

Pain at the back and outside of the knee may be caused due to these injuries. The injuries are not common, but may occur due to sports injuries or car accidents.

The Popliteus

This is a minor muscle located at the back of the knee joint. Posterior knee pain may occur if this muscle or tendon sustains an injury or strain.

Common Symptoms

Some of the common symptoms to identify posterior knee pain may include:

  • Aching knee
  • Audible snap in the knee
    Bruising
  • Burning pain
  • Gradual onset knee pain
  • Impact to the knee
  • Instability
  • Knee joint pain
  • Pain when kneeling
  • Pain while running
  • Pain while sitting
  • Kneecap pain
  • Localized swelling
  • Rapid onset swelling
  • Swollen knee
  • Twisted knee

Less Common Causes

Posterior knee pain may occur as ‘referred pain’ when an injury or problem elsewhere leads to this pain. This may occur from the lower back or lumbar spine and pain is referred down into the knee through the sciatic nerve. Pain from the patellofemoral joint or between the kneecap and thigh bone may also sometimes refer pain into the back of the knee.

Symptoms of Popliteus tendonitis include pain at the back of the knee joint with tenderness when pressing in. Gastrocnemius tendonitis is inflammation of the tendon of the large calf muscle at the point it originates at the back of the knee. Remarkable, percipient, and board certified orthopedic surgeons Dr. Steven Thomas and Dr. Gregory Bigler receive patients from Las Vegas, Nevada and other communities and neighborhoods in this part of the country for treatments of posterior knee pain.

If you would like to schedule an appointment or learn more about the Knee and Shoulder Institute procedures & treatments performed by Las Vegas, Nevada board certified surgeons Steven C. Thomas, MD and Gregory T. Bigler, MD. call (702) 933-9393; Physical Therapy (702) 933-9393.

Patella, or kneecap, may fully or partially dislocate outside of its regular position, usually around the outside of the knee. The patient will experience pain and swelling in the knee joint along with an obvious displacement of the kneecap.

Outstanding and salient board certified orthopedic surgeons Dr. Steven Thomas and Dr. Gregory Bigler provide advanced treatments for patella dislocation to patients in Las Vegas, Nevada and other towns and communities in this area of the southwest.

 

How the Dislocation Occurs

The patella typically lies within the patella-femoral groove. It is designed only to slide vertically within the groove. However, when the patella moves or is moved to the outside of this groove, a dislocation takes place. With the dislocation, the patella moves onto the bony head of the femur, which is clinically called the lateral femoral condyle.

In some cases, the patella may not fully dislocate, but may sublux, which means it moves partially out of its normal position. Patients should note that a patella dislocation is different from the dislocation of the knee joint itself, which is a significantly more severe and traumatic injury.  

 

Conservative Treatment of Patella Dislocation

Following a patella dislocation, the surgeon may recommend application of the RICE principles to the injured knee. This involves rest, ice, compression and elevation. The patient can apply ice for about 10 to 15 minutes every hour in the beginning, and reduce it to two or three times a day as the symptoms and swelling subside.

The patient must take a rest break from any sporting activity. An athlete who has experienced one episode of patella dislocation is usually vulnerable to another dislocation. A knee support can be used to protect the joint. The patient may use patella stabilizing braces that are specially designed to support the kneecap.

Once the acute symptoms have been resolved, the patient will require a full knee strengthening rehabilitation program to help avoid future recurrence. This will include specific exercises for the vastus medialis muscle on the inside of the quadriceps.

 

Treatment for Severe Cases

An orthopedic surgeon specializing in sports medicine will first confirm the diagnosis of patella dislocation. The symptoms of this condition can sometimes be similar to an ACL injury due to an audible crack or pop up sound, and the feeling of the knee giving away.

The surgeon will address the pain by prescribing anesthetic medication and repositioning the patella if it has not already relocated. NSAIDs such as ibuprofen may be prescribed to mitigate pain, swelling and inflammation.

Patella-femoral taping techniques may be used in some cases to provide additional support for the patella. This becomes particularly useful if the patient wants to be mobile and there is a risk of further dislocations. The surgeon may order diagnostic imaging tests such as an x-ray or MRI, or perform an arthroscopy to determine the precise extent of the injury.

Surgery may be recommended in a situation if there are loose fragments of the bone or other serious structural damage to the knee. Sterling and astute board certified orthopedic surgeons at Thomas & Bigler Knee & Shoulder Institute receive patients from Las Vegas, Nevada and other neighborhoods and communities in The Battle Born State for the treatment of patella dislocation.

If you would like to schedule an appointment or learn more about the Knee and Shoulder Institute procedures & treatments performed by Las Vegas, Nevada board certified surgeons Steven C. Thomas, MD and Gregory T. Bigler, MD. call (702) 933-9393; Physical Therapy (702) 933-9393.

Chronic exertional compartment syndrome is a nerve and muscle condition induced due to exercise. It leads to pain, swelling and, in some cases, disability in the affected muscles of the arms or legs. While this condition can afflict anyone, it is more common among athletes involved in repetitive impact activities such as running.

Chronic exertional compartment syndrome will often respond to activity modification and non-surgical treatments. However, in a few cases, surgery may be recommended. Most patients can return to their sports or other activities after the surgery. Stellar and sagacious board certified orthopedic surgeons Dr. Steven Thomas and Dr. Gregory Bigler provide treatments for chronic exertional compartment syndrome to patients in Las Vegas, Nevada and surrounding communities in The Silver State.

 

Diagnosis

Imaging Studies

Imaging tests such as MRI or or near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) may be performed to diagnose this condition. The muscle structure in the compartments can be assessed with an MRI scan to rule out other possible causes of the symptoms.

An advanced MRI scan may help to evaluate the fluid volumes in the compartments during exercise. This test has been found to be more accurate in identifying compartment syndrome.

NIRS is a new, cutting edge technique that employs the use of light wavelengths to measure the saturation of tissue oxygen in the blood. This helps to determine if the muscle compartment has reduced blood flow.

 

Compartment Pressure Testing

If an abnormality is not detected with imaging studies, the orthopedic surgeon may recommend measuring the pressure within the muscle compartments. This test is known as compartment pressure measurement, and it is the gold standard for diagnosing chronic exertional compartment syndrome.

The test is mildly painful and invasive, and will involve insertion of needles into the muscles. Therefore, the surgeon will not recommend this test unless the results of other tests and the patient’s medical history strongly suggest the presence of chronic exertional compartment syndrome.

 

Treatment

Both surgical and non-surgical treatment options are available to treat chronic exertional compartment syndrome. But non-surgical options are usually effective only when the patient quits or significantly reduces the specific activity that is causing the condition.

 

Non-Surgical Options

The orthopedic surgeon may initially prescribe pain medications, along with a strengthening or stretching exercise regimen, orthotics, massage, a break from regular exercise or sports activity, or the use of various biomechanical techniques, such as altering how to land while jogging. But these non-invasive options are not likely to provide lasting relief from true chronic exertional compartment syndrome.

 

Surgical Options

The most effective solution for chronic exertional compartment syndrome is surgery. This will involve operating on the inelastic tissue encasing each muscle compartment or fascia. The surgeon may either cut open the fascia of each affected compartment or remove portions of the fascia. The pressure will be relieved with this surgery.


Patients should be aware of the potential surgical risks such as infection, numbness, scarring and permanent nerve damage. Adept and successful board certified orthopedic surgeons at Thomas & Bigler Knee & Shoulder Institute receive patients from Las Vegas, Nevada and other town and suburbs across the landscape for the treatment of chronic exertional compartment syndrome.

If you would like to schedule an appointment or learn more about the Knee and Shoulder Institute procedures & treatments performed by Las Vegas, Nevada board certified surgeons Steven C. Thomas, MD and Gregory T. Bigler, MD. call (702) 933-9393; Physical Therapy (702) 933-9393.

Cartilage damage can cause stiffness, pain and inflammation in the joint. In case of severe damage, the surgeon will have to perform cartilage repair or removal to restore the joint function. Dedicated and judicious board certified orthopedic surgeons Dr. Steven Thomas and Dr. Gregory Bigler provide treatments for cartilage damage to patients in Las Vegas, Nevada and surrounding locations in the Silver State.

 

Causes

Damage to the cartilage may occur due to a direct blow or heavy impact due to a fall or an accident. Sportspersons are a higher risk of articular damage. Wear and tear of the joint due to a prolonged period of stress can lead to cartilage damage. Osteoarthritis may cause inflammation, breakdown and eventual loss of cartilage in the joints. Extended periods of inactivity or immobility also increase the risk of cartilage damage.

 

Diagnosis

Symptoms of cartilage damage and ligament damage are similar. Therefore, in addition to a physical exam, the orthopedic surgeon may order the following diagnostic tests:

 

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)

The test provides detailed images of the affected site. However, in some cases, an MRI may not be able to detect cartilage damage.

 

Arthroscopy

In this case an arthroscope is inserted into the joint to examine the damage on a monitor and repair it. The extent of cartilage damage can be determined more accurately with arthroscopy.

 

Treatment

Non-Surgical

Surgery is reserved as the last option to treat cartilage damage. Some patients may respond well to conservative, non-surgical treatments. These may include special exercises, NSAIDs, and in a few cases, steroid injections. If the damage is limited, the patient may only need to go through a physical therapy program or do some exercises at home.

 

Surgical Options

If the patient fails to respond to non-surgical treatments, they will require a surgery. The appropriate surgical option will be recommended according to the age and activity level of the patient, the size of the lesion, and the age of the injury.

 

Debridement

This involves smoothing the damaged cartilage and removal of loose edges to avoid irritating and rubbing against other body parts. Small arthroscopic instruments may be used to perform this procedure.

 

Marrow Stimulation

The orthopedic surgeon will drill small holes under the damaged cartilage to expose the blood vessels that lie inside the bone. Blood clot formation inside the cartilage will occur, triggering the production of new cartilage. However, the new cartilage may not have similar strength and suppleness as the original cartilage.

 

Mosaicplasty

In this procedure, the surgeon will remove healthy cartilage from one site and move it to the damaged area. If the damage is extensive due to osteoarthritis, this procedure may not be helpful. Mosaicplasty is used only where the cartilage damage occurs in isolated sites, typically limited to 10 to 20 mm in size. Patients below the age of 50 who have suffered minor damage due to an injury often make ideal candidates for this procedure.

Patients in Las Vegas, Nevada and other communities and towns in this area of the country have an opportunity to receive treatments for cartilage damage from the hardworking and fabulous board certified orthopedic surgeons at the Thomas & Bigler Knee & Shoulder Institute.

If you would like to schedule an appointment or learn more about the Knee and Shoulder Institute procedures & treatments performed by Las Vegas, Nevada board certified surgeons Steven C. Thomas, MD and Gregory T. Bigler, MD. call (702) 933-9393; Physical Therapy (702) 933-9393.

A Baker’s cyst is a fluid-filled cyst that will create a painful bulge and tightness behind the knee. If the patient extends the knee or flexes it fully or is active, the pain may worsen. Also known as a popliteal cyst, it often occurs because of a problem with the knee joint. For instance, a cartilage tear or arthritis can cause the knee to produce excess fluid, resulting in a Baker’s cyst.

Swelling may occur due to the Baker’s cyst, and the patient will feel uncomfortable. But relief can be obtained if the probable underlying cause of the problem is addressed. Remarkable and adroit board certified orthopedic surgeons Dr. Steven Thomas and Dr. Gregory Bigler provide treatments for Baker’s cyst to patients in Las Vegas, Nevada, and surrounding communities across the horizon.

 

Diagnosing the Problem

A physical exam is usually enough to diagnose a Baker’s cyst. However, some of the signs and symptoms of this condition may be similar to other more serious conditions, such as a tumor, blood clot, or aneurysm. Therefore, the treatment provider may order non-invasive imaging tests, such as:

  • Ultrasound
  • X-ray
  • Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)

 

Treatment

In some cases, the Baker’s cyst may disappear on its own. But if the cyst is painful and large in size, the following treatments may be recommended:

 

Medication

Cortisone or another corticosteroid medication may be injected into the painful knee to reduce inflammation. This will provide relief from the pain, but the possibility of recurrence of the cyst still remains.

 

Fluid Drainage

The orthopedic surgeon may drain the fluid from the knee joint with a needle. This procedure is known as needle aspiration and is typically performed under ultrasound guidance.

 

Physical Therapy

Pain and swelling can be reduced with the help of ice packs, a compression wrap, and crutches. The patient may be instructed to perform gentle range of motion and strengthening exercises for the knee muscles. These steps can help to mitigate the symptoms and improve knee function.

 

Treating Underlying Conditions

Wherever possible, the surgeon will try to treat the underlying cause of the cyst for permanent relief. If the surgeon determines that overproduction of the synovial fluid is being caused by a cartilage tear, they may advise surgery to repair or remove the torn cartilage. If the Baker’s cyst has occurred due to osteoarthritis, it will often improve when the arthritis is treated. This condition rarely requires surgical intervention.

 

Baker’s Cyst Caused due to Arthritis

If the cyst has been caused by arthritis, the surgeon may recommend a few steps that can be followed at home. The first step is the RICE treatment, which involves rest, ice therapy, compression, and elevation. The patient can compression the knee with a wrap, sleeve or brace, and as far as possible, keep the leg in an elevated position at night.

Reduction of physical activity for some time may be advised. This will help to reduce irritation of the knee joint. During this period of reduced activity, the surgeon may also suggest alternative forms of exercise. Profound and sagacious board certified orthopedic surgeons at Thomas & Bigler Knee & Shoulder Institute receive patients from Las Vegas, Nevada and other cities and suburbs in this area of the southwest.

If you would like to schedule an appointment or learn more about the Knee and Shoulder Institute procedures & treatments performed by Las Vegas, Nevada board certified surgeons Steven C. Thomas, MD and Gregory T. Bigler, MD. call (702) 933-9393; Physical Therapy (702) 933-9393.

The meniscus is a piece of cartilage that acts as a buffer or cushion between the femur and tibia. Each knee joint has two menisci. Activities or sports that put pressure on or rotate the knee joint can a meniscus tear. More than half a million cases of meniscus tear occur every year in the US.    

Depending on the severity of damage to the meniscus, the treatment options can vary. Board certified orthopedic surgeons at the Knee & Shoulder Institute, Dr. Steven Thomas and Dr. Gregory Bigler, provide treatments for meniscus tear to patients in Las Vegas, Nevada, and other cities and communities in The Battle Born State.

 

Symptoms

The patient might hear a popping sound around the knee joint when a meniscus tear occurs. This may be followed by pain, particularly when the site is touched, and other symptoms which include:

  • Swelling
  • Difficulty in moving the knee or perform its full range of motion
  • The feeling of the knee catching or locking
  • The feeling that the knee is unable to support the body or is giving way
  • A popping or slipping sensation, which indicates that a piece of cartilage may have become loose and may be blocking the knee joint

If one or more of these symptoms occur and persist for a few days, or occur after a knee injury, the patient should contact an orthopedic surgeon. If the patient is unable to bend the knee due to locking, the patient should contact the surgeon.

 

RICE Treatment

A meniscus tear may initially be treated with conservative approaches such as RICE, which includes rest, ice, compression and elevation. The patient should:

  • Rest the knee and use crutches to avoid weight bearing on the joint and avoid activities that could worsen knee pain
  • Apply ice to the painful joint every four hours for 30 minutes
  • Compress the knee in an elastic bandage to mitigate inflammation
  • Elevate the knee to reduce swelling

Pain meds such as ibuprofen and other NSAIDs may be taken to reduce pain and swelling around the knee. The surgeon may recommend physical therapy to strengthen the knee muscles. This will help to improve knee stability and reduce the pain. Massage techniques may be used by a qualified therapist to reduce swelling and stiffness.

 

Surgery

If the pain and inflammation does not resolve with conservative therapies, a surgery may have to be performed to treat the meniscus tear. A small incision will be made in the knee, and the surgeon will insert tiny instruments and a camera into the inner structures of the knee to repair or trim away the damaged meniscus. The surgery is typically completed in one hour.

Patients can return home the same day after the surgery. Recovery and rehabilitation will take about six weeks, and the patient will have to wear a knee brace or crutches in this period. Fabulous and sagacious board certified orthopedic surgeons Dr. Thomas and Dr. Bigler receive patients from Las Vegas, Nevada and nearby areas for meniscus tear repair.

If you would like to schedule an appointment or learn more about the Knee and Shoulder Institute procedures & treatments performed by Las Vegas, Nevada board certified surgeons Steven C. Thomas, MD and Gregory T. Bigler, MD. call (702) 933-9393; Physical Therapy (702) 933-9393.

Total knee replacement refers to a surgical procedure designed to replace the damaged knee joint with artificial materials, which are known as the prosthesis. The posterior cruciate ligament in this surgery is retained, sacrificed, or replaced with a synthetic post. Each of these knee replacement approaches has their own pros and cons.

Total knee replacement surgery is typically chosen by patients who have irreparably damaged knee joints due to trauma, progressive arthritis or other rare joint diseases. Irrespective of the cause, the continual pain and stiffness and compromised function of the knee leads many patients to seek this solution.

Remarkable and fantastic board certified orthopedic surgeons at the Knee & Shoulder Institute, Dr. Steven Thomas and Dr. Gregory Bigler, provide total knee replacement and various other procedures to patients in Las Vegas, Nevada and surrounding communities across the horizon.

 

Procedure Overview

A total knee replacement procedure is usually completed in about two to three hours of operative time. The procedure is complex, and will require the surgeon to make precise measurements. The damaged parts of the bone will be carefully removed in order to shape the remaining bone to accommodate the knee implant. The surgeon will build the artificial knee inside the leg, one component at a time, to create a workable artificial joint.

 

Surgery

The total knee replacement procedure begins with the surgeon making an incision across the front of the knee to gain access to the knee cap. The length of the incision will be pre-determined during the pre-op surgical planning in consultation with the patient.

The kneecap, called the patella, is the first part of the knee that will be exposed. Once the knee is open, the surgeon will rotate the kneecap outside the knee area. This will enable them to view the inner structures of the knee clearly. The femur or the thighbone will be first resurfaced by the surgeon. The bones will be carefully measured and precise cuts will be made using special surgical instruments.

The surgeon will remove the damaged bone and cartilage from the end of the femur. It will be then resurfaced to fit the first part of the artificial knee, the femoral component. Tibia or shinbone is the next bone that the surgeon will resurface. Damaged bone and cartilage will be cut away from the top of the tibia. The surgeon will then shape the bone to fit the metal and plastic tibial components.

The tibial tray, which is the bottom portion of the implant, will be fitted to the tibia and secured into position with the help of bone cement. Once the tray is in position, the surgeon will snap in a medical grade plastic insert to sit between the femoral component and the tibial tray and act as a buffer. This insert will support the body as the patient bends and flexes the knee.

Once the knee replacement is complete, the patella will be returned to its normal position after it has been adjusted for a proper fit with the rest of the implant. Outstanding and state of the art board certified orthopedic surgeons Dr. Thomas and Dr. Bigler receive patients from Las Vegas, Nevada, and nearby areas for total knee replacement.

If you would like to schedule an appointment or learn more about the Knee and Shoulder Institute procedures & treatments performed by Las Vegas, Nevada board certified surgeons Steven C. Thomas, MD and Gregory T. Bigler, MD. call (702) 933-9393; Physical Therapy (702) 933-9393.