Shoulder Sprain | Las Vegas Orthopedic Surgery | Orthopedic SurgeonsShoulder Sprain Treatment

A shoulder sprain occurs when there is a tear in the ligaments, which are strong bands of fibrous tissues connecting one bone to another inside or around the joint of the shoulder. It is a common misconception that the shoulder has a single joint between the humerus and the torso, though it actually has numerous smaller joints outside the socket of the arm bone.

Judicious and board certified orthopedic surgeons at the Thomas & Bigler Knee & Shoulder Institute provide treatments for shoulder sprain to patients in Las Vegas, Nevada, and surrounding locations across the horizon.

 

Types of Shoulder Sprain

Spraining the shoulder could indicate a fiber stretch as well as a partial or a fully torn ligament or joint capsule. A ligament tearing sprain in the shoulder mostly takes place at the joint between the collarbone and acromion, referred to as the acromioclavicular joint.

A shoulder sprain is sometimes also known as a shoulder separation. In certain cases, a shoulder sprain may occur in the sternoclavicular joint between the collarbone and the breastbone, which is located within an inch of the chest’s midline.

 

Symptoms

The symptoms of shoulder sprain vary according to how serious the injury is. It can range from mild to severe, and includes shoulder pain, usually at the joint’s front portion. A patient can also feel tenderness if they press the injured area. Really bad shoulder sprains can lead to a shoulder joint instability.

 

Causes

A force or a heavy impact on the arm, which stretches the shoulder ligaments, usually causes a sprained shoulder. This occurs particularly when the force makes the arm go back when it is raised to a level of 90 degrees at the shoulder. The impact can stretch or tear the capsule or ligaments at the front of the shoulder.

A shoulder sprain is not a common occurrence because the shoulder ligaments are generally quite strong. Moreover, the muscles located at the shoulder’s front portion, such as the pectorals, are more inclined to get injured first.

 

Treatment

The sprain type and its grade influence the injury’s treatment.

Acromioclavicular joint sprains

If it is a Grade I or II sprain, then the surgeon will advise rest, cold therapy, and a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug such as ibuprofen to get relief from swelling and pain. The arm is also placed in a sling for one to three weeks. If the injury is of Grade III, then the sling has to be worn for four weeks, and in some cases, surgery may be required.

 

Sternoclavicular joint sprains

For Grade I sprains, rest, cold therapy and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are prescribed. The arm is put in a sling for one to two weeks. If the injury is of Grade II level, then the patient has to wear the sling for three to six weeks. Grade III sprains are treated with a procedure called closed reduction, where the displaced collarbone is carefully put back into place.

Outstanding, stellar, and board certified orthopedic surgeons Dr. Steven Thomas and Dr. Gregory Bigler receive patients from Las Vegas, Nevada, and other towns and cities in this part of America for the treatment of shoulder sprains.

If you would like to schedule an appointment or learn more about the Knee and Shoulder Institute procedures & treatments performed by Las Vegas, Nevada board certified surgeons Steven C. Thomas, MD and Gregory T. Bigler, MD. call (702) 933-9393; Physical Therapy (702) 933-9393.

Rotator cuff tendonitis, also known as rotator cuff tendinopathy, is a degenerative condition that affects one or more of the rotator cuff tendons located on the shoulder. A previous injury such as a rotator cuff partial dislocation or strain can lead to rotator cuff tendonitis. 

The condition is one of the most common causes of shoulder pain. A patient can feel it coming on gradually over time or after straining the rotator cuff because it has not healed properly.

Terrific and board certified orthopedic surgeons at the Thomas & Bigler Knee & Shoulder Institute provide treatments for rotator cuff tendonitis to patients in Las Vegas, Nevada, and surrounding locations across the horizon.

Symptoms

Shoulder tendonitis is associated with shoulder pain while resting or due to certain movements. The pain may occur even while sleeping at night. A patient also feels pain when performing overhead activities such as playing racket sports or swimming.

However, pain caused by arm movements below shoulder height is less common in rotator cuff tendinopathy. A patient may also feel a creaking, referred to as crepitus, while performing shoulder movements.

Treatment

The condition can be diagnosed and any tearing of the tendon can be identified with the help of a MRI scan. The rotator cuff tendinopathy treatment includes two stages. The first part consists of treating the symptoms to reduce the inflammation and pain, so that the patient can make normal movement. The second stage includes addressing the underlying causes of the condition and correcting them.

As a first part of the treatment, the patient should perform RICE therapy as follows:

 

  • Rest: The patient should refrain from activities that cause pain. Rest is advised.

 

  • Ice or cold therapy: Pain and inflammation can be reduced with the help of ice or cold therapy. The patient can apply ice for 10 minutes every hour. The frequency can be gradually reduced to applying ice for 15 minutes every three to four hours, based on the state of the condition.

 

  • Exercises: It is imperative for patients to exercise once the pain and inflammation has subsided enough to allow it.

Other Treatments

Medication

The surgeon may prescribe ibuprofen or other anti inflammatory medication that brings about pain relief in the early stages of the injury.

Electrotherapy

Treatments such as magnetic field, laser, interferential stimulation, or ultrasound may be helpful in mitigating pain and inflammation.

Massage

A sports massage may bring about relaxation and loosen the tightness of the shoulder muscles. A cross friction massage on the tendon can be helpful if cold therapy or other initial conservative treatment cannot address the chronic injury.

Corticosteroid Injections

Injecting corticosteroid into the subacromial space of the shoulder can help reduce the pain and inflammation as well as facilitate the initiation to an exercise rehabilitation program.

Treatment may be difficult if there is tendon calcification or bone growth. In such cases, the surgeon may suggest keyhole surgery. Fantastic and board certified orthopedic surgeons Dr. Steven Thomas and Dr. Gregory Bigler receive patients from Las Vegas, Nevada, and other suburbs and neighborhoods in The Silver State for the poignant treatment of shoulder tendonitis.

If you would like to schedule an appointment or learn more about the Knee and Shoulder Institute procedures & treatments performed by Las Vegas, Nevada board certified surgeons Steven C. Thomas, MD and Gregory T. Bigler, MD. call (702) 933-9393; Physical Therapy (702) 933-9393.

A posterior shoulder dislocation takes place when the head of the long bone in the upper arm, known as the humerus, moves backward out of the socket. The humerus bone is most likely felt at the back of the joint. It is quite a rare shoulder injury because the majority of shoulder dislocations are anterior. Proximal Humerus Growth Plate Fracture | Las Vegas Orthopedic Surgery

Remarkable, sagacious, and board certified orthopedic surgeons at the Thomas & Bigler Knee & Shoulder Institute provide treatments for posterior shoulder dislocation to patients in Las Vegas, Nevada, and surrounding towns and neighborhoods in this part of the US.

Symptoms

The symptoms of a dislocated shoulder posterior include excruciating pain in the joint of the shoulder at the time of injury, followed by rapid swelling. The condition leads to a total loss of shoulder function and the patient is not only in constant pain but is also unable to use the arm. The afflicted shoulder also has a deformed appearance and the patient usually wants to hold out the arm to the side and rotate it inward.

Causes

Shoulder posterior dislocations usually happen due to two reasons, either because of a direct hit to the humeral head’s front, or by falling onto an outstretched arm. Both the causes leading to shoulder posterior dislocations can occur due to sports activities, particularly contact sports. These may also occur due to trauma caused by vehicle accidents and epileptic seizures where the patient violently thrashes their arm.

Treatment

A patient should seek medical attention immediately for posterior shoulder dislocation. They should not move their shoulder or try to put it back into position on their own. An orthopedic surgeon will check the hand, wrist, sensations and pulses in the arm to determine if there is any blood vessel or nerve damage.

For minor dislocations and conditions where there are no associated fractures, a surgeon can actually pop back the dislocated bone back into place. In any case the patient will be administered an anesthetic, sedatives, or relaxants before such a step is carried out.

The surgeon will then prescribe adequate rest to give time to the soft tissues in the shoulder to heal. Subsequently, the patient will be put on a rehabilitation program to regain strength and full movement.

Severe cases that involve fractures, damage to nerves or blood vessels, or extensive soft tissue injury may require surgery to treat the humeral head and repair the injured structures. Surgery will have to be followed by a period of complete rest and a comprehensive rehabilitation program.

Surgery

A surgeon may operate when the patient has recurrent dislocation or subluxation. In such cases, an individual’s torn cartilage and ligaments are reattached to the bone with stitches or sutures.

If the subluxation or dislocation is secondary to the stretched ligaments, then first the surgeon will tighten the ligament with a process called capsular shift or capsulorraphy, and then secure it with sutures or stitches.

If a patient has stretched ligaments, which are also torn away from the bone, then both the procedures can be carried out. Golden and board certified orthopedic surgeons Dr. Steven Thomas and Dr. Gregory Bigler receive patients from Las Vegas, Nevada, and nearby areas in The Battle Born State for the treatment of posterior shoulder dislocation.

If you would like to schedule an appointment or learn more about the Knee and Shoulder Institute procedures & treatments performed by Las Vegas, Nevada board certified surgeons Steven C. Thomas, MD and Gregory T. Bigler, MD. call (702) 933-9393; Physical Therapy (702) 933-9393.

The biceps muscle bifurcates into two tendons at the shoulder, which is the long tendon and the short tendon. The long tendon goes over the upper arm’s top and attaches to the shoulder blade’s top.

Long tendon inflammation of the biceps muscle, also known as biceps tendinitis, is a common condition that may typically affect weightlifters, golfers, throwers, rowers, and swimmers.

Innovative, cordial, and board certified orthopedic surgeons at the Thomas & Bigler Knee & Shoulder Institute provide treatments for biceps inflammation to patients in Las Vegas, Nevada, and other cities and suburbs in The Sagebrush State.

Symptoms

Biceps tendon inflammation is characterized by pain at the shoulder’s front where the biceps muscle’s long head attaches. A patient can isolate the biceps tendon by lifting their arm straight up in front against resistance, which reproduces the pain at the shoulder front. An individual can also feel tenderness when they press over the tendon at the same point.

Treatment

An athlete inflicted with long head of biceps inflammation should rest until the pain subsides. The patient should apply ice to get relief from pain and inflammation. The patient should apply ice for 10 to 15 minutes every hour in the beginning and thereby should reduce the frequency as there is gradual improvement. Patients must also consult a sports injury professional.

A sports injury specialist will prescribe ibuprofen or other anti-inflammatory medication. The specialist or a physical therapist may also demonstrate strengthening and stretching exercises as a part of a full rehabilitation program. A trained theapist may give a sports massage to the injured muscle. If the case is chronic then a sports injury specialist can apply a cross friction massage to the tendon.

Non-Surgical Treatment

An orthopedic surgeon will usually start the treatment of biceps tendinitis with simple methods, such as prescribing non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medicines and drugs like naproxen and ibuprofen to reduce swelling and pain. The surgeon may also prescribe cortisone steroids, which are impactful anti-inflammatory medicines. Steroid injections in the tendon can bring about pain relief.

Physical therapy, including specific strengthening and stretching exercises may also be prescribed to help restore the strength and motion of the shoulder.

Surgical Treatment

If the patient’s condition does not become better with non-surgical treatment, then a surgeon may offer to operate. Surgery also makes for a prudent option if the patient is afflicted with other shoulder problems.

Arthroscopic Surgery

Arthroscopic surgery involves inserting of an arthroscope and very small surgical instruments into the joint of the shoulder. Biceps tendinitis surgery is generally performed arthroscopically as it allows the surgeon to assess the biceps tendon’s condition as well as the other shoulder structures.

The arthroscope is a small camera that shows images on a television screen, which are used by the surgeon to guide the miniature surgical instruments.

Biceps Tenodesis

In some cases, a surgeon can carry out biceps tenodesis where the bicep’s damaged section is removed and the remaining tendon is reattached to the humerus. Salient, astute, and board certified orthopedic surgeons Dr. Steven Thomas and Dr. Gregory Bigler receive patients from Las Vegas, Nevada, and other neighborhoods and towns in this area of the southwest for the treatment of biceps inflammation.

If you would like to schedule an appointment or learn more about the Knee and Shoulder Institute procedures & treatments performed by Las Vegas, Nevada board certified surgeons Steven C. Thomas, MD and Gregory T. Bigler, MD. call (702) 933-9393; Physical Therapy (702) 933-9393.

What is Clavicle Muscle Attachments Inflammation?

The collarbone, medically known as the human clavicle, is a short bone that connects the arms to the trunk. One can easily feel it by placing their hand on the area of the skin, which is right above the first rib. The clavicle can be easily seen in thin people.

The human clavicle is a resilient and strong bone that takes the weight of the upper limb, while remaining firmly in its position to give stability to the muscles as well as the ligaments attached to it.

Board certified orthopedic surgeons at Thomas & Bigler Knee and Shoulder Institute provide treatments for clavicle muscle attachments inflammation to patients in Las Vegas, Nevada, and surrounding communities.

Swollen Clavicle

Any type of enlargement near the collarbone or fluid accumulation can lead to a swollen clavicle. In certain cases, the swelling is not related to the collarbone but rather a soft tissue injury that commonly impacts the muscles and subcutaneous tissue, which further leads to swelling over the collarbone.

The swelling could be due to any of the muscles that attach the collarbone or the platysma muscle, an area right over the clavicle. Clavicle swelling is also referred to as bony swelling and is more noticeable with a fracture.

Causes of Swollen Clavicle

Any of the following reasons can cause a swollen clavicle:

  • Injury: A bone injury or a trauma in the surrounding tissue can lead to a swollen clavicle.
  • Bone disorders: Certain bone growth disorders like Paget’s disease can lead to a swollen collarbone.
  • Infection: A clavicle infection can lead to pain and swelling in the surrounding tissue; however, the chances of this occurring are rare.
  • Vitamin D deficiency: Inadequate intake of vitamin D can decrease the amount of calcium the body gets, which can also result in bone deformation and a swollen clavicle.
  • Arthritis and osteoarthritis: These afflictions can produce a wear and tear effect on joints, resulting in a swollen collarbone.
  • Joint problems: An inflammation of the joints surrounding the collarbone can also lead to a swelling of the clavicle.

Treatment for Swollen Clavicle

One should treat a swollen clavicle according to the underlying cause. For instance, a swollen clavicle caused by fracture or injury should be treated by keeping the arms immobile with the help of a sling.

If arthritis is the cause of a swollen clavicle, then the most common treatments are rest and taking pain medication. However, one might also need physiotherapy or surgery depending on the seriousness of the condition.

In case of infection-related swollen clavicle, it is necessary to treat the underlying infection to address the swollen lymph nodes.

Patients should consult with an orthopedic surgeon immediately if they notice tenderness, redness, or pain associated with the swelling. A swollen clavicle can quickly return back to its normal state with adequate diagnosis and treatment.

Board certified orthopedic surgeons Dr. Steven Thomas and Dr. Gregory Bigler receive patients from Las Vegas, Nevada, and nearby areas for clavicle muscle inflammation treatment.

If you would like to schedule an appointment or learn more about the Knee and Shoulder Institute procedures & treatments performed by Las Vegas, Nevada board certified surgeons Steven C. Thomas, MD and Gregory T. Bigler, MD. call (702) 933-9393; Physical Therapy (702) 933-9393.

What is Subscapularis Inflammation?

The subscapularis, which belongs to the rotator cuff group of muscles in the body, is a strong muscle that helps in rotating the arm inwards. However, it can be injured easily by throwers and is difficult to treat. The subscapularis muscle starts from the shoulder blade’s underside and inserts at the front of the humerus.

A partial injury to the subscapularis muscle occurs more commonly than a total rupture. Board certified orthopedic surgeons at Thomas & Bigler Knee and Shoulder Institute provide treatments for subscapularis inflammation to patients in Las Vegas, Nevada, and surrounding communities.

Symptoms

The symptoms of an inflamed subscapularis include pain related to shoulder movement, which occurs particularly when the patient tries to raise their arms over the shoulders. A patient can figure out if they have subscapularis inflammation with the help of certain tests that reproduce pain to facilitate in diagnosing the problem.

The surgeon may ask the patient to rotate their arm inwards, against resistance, to see if their subscapularis is inflamed. Pain and tenderness are felt when pressing in on the tendon insertion on the interior of the upper arm.

Treatment for Inflamed Subscapularis

Athletes who have an inflamed subscapularis should rest until the pain subsides. Applying ice at the initial stage can reduce the inflammation and pain. Patients should consult a sports injury professional to get advice on rehabilitation.

Sports injury specialists usually prescribe anti-inflammatory medications like ibuprofen. They also use sports massage techniques to bring about relief, as well as put the patient on a strength training, flexibility, and mobility program.

People who have suffered a partial rupture can get back in training within a few weeks, as long as they look after the injury.

Diagnosis of Subscapularis Tendinitis

An orthopedic surgeon will confirm if a person has subscapularis tendinitis by evaluating the shoulder thoroughly to look for signs of abnormality in the motion range. The patient will be asked to elevate their elbows and rotate the forearms internally.

Treatment for Subscapularis Tendinitis

The treatment of subscapularis tendinitis can vary depending on how severe the inflammation may be. A subscapular tendon that is mildly or moderately inflamed can be treated with anti-inflammatory medication and applying hot or cold therapy.

A patient will be advised to rest for at least one to two weeks during treatment to help prevent further aggravation of the condition. One should be careful as the subscapularis tendon is a very important part of the shoulder joint and rotator cuff.

A tear that is accompanied by tendon inflammation has to be treated surgically, which involves exposing the tendon to identify the torn ligament. Subsequently, the doctor will isolate and remove the torn tendon of the rotator cuff and reattach the adjacent normal tendon to its normal position.

Board certified orthopedic surgeons Dr. Steven Thomas and Dr. Gregory Bigler receive patients from Las Vegas, Nevada, and other cities and towns in this section of The Sagebrush State for subscapularis inflammation treatment.

If you would like to schedule an appointment or learn more about the Knee and Shoulder Institute procedures & treatments performed by Las Vegas, Nevada board certified surgeons Steven C. Thomas, MD and Gregory T. Bigler, MD. call (702) 933-9393; Physical Therapy (702) 933-9393.

Shoulder tendonitis is a degenerative affliction that impacts any of the tendons surrounding the shoulder joint. In general, the condition affects the rotator cuff tendons, but it can also impact the triceps and biceps tendons.

The tendonitis of the shoulder is generally a repetitive or an overuse injury, occurring due to poor posture and shoulder muscle imbalance, which leads to more pressure on a single muscle or tendon than it can bear.

The condition occurs more commonly in people who use the shoulder joint excessively to work their arms overhead, such as manual workers like electricians and carpenters or throwers who participate in field events like javelin or games like baseball.

Board certified orthopedic surgeons at the Thomas & Bigler Knee & Shoulder Institute provide treatments for shoulder tendonitis to patients in Las Vegas, Nevada, and surrounding locations.

Tenosynovitis

Tendonitis is also known as tenosynovitis, tendinitis, and tendinopathy. Tenosynovitis is a problem associated with the outer sheath that lines the tendon and not with the tendon fibers themselves. However, it is not possible to differentiate between tendonitis and tenosynovitis with an ultrasound scan investigation. The treatment for both the conditions is the same; therefore, in most cases, surgeons do not distinguish between the two afflictions which can also occur together.

Symptoms of Shoulder Tendonitis

The symptoms of shoulder tenosynovitis include pain, which comes gradually with shoulder movement. The exact movement that brings about pain indicates which tendon or tendons are inflamed.

For instance, the occurrence of pain while rotating the shoulders indicate rotator cuff injuries, and pain related to the flexing or upward movement of shoulder shows a problem with the bicep tendonitis. The pain usually becomes worse after rest and starts diminishing when activity warms up the area.

A painful tendon may feel thickened, when the patient presses in to feel the tendon, in comparison with the other side. Furthermore, a patient could also have a creaking feeling, which is referred to as crepitus in the tendon as it moves.

Treatment

Patients who have shoulder tendonitis should take ample rest because the condition can become aggravated by movements and activities. The pain and swelling can be eased by applying ice or other cold therapy treatments for 15 minutes, every three to four hours. An individual who has shoulder tendonitis should also consult a sports injury professional.

An orthopedic surgeon will assess the condition before confirming the diagnosis with the help of ultrasound scans or MRI. They may use electrotherapy treatments such as laser or ultrasound, or sports massage techniques to bring relief to the affected muscles.

A surgeon will also determine the cause of shoulder tendonitis in the patient and address any postural or muscle imbalance issues. Subsequently, they will create a rehabilitation program for improving the shoulder posture and strength of the impacted muscles.

In most cases, the condition can be treated without any invasive procedure, but major degeneration of the tendons may require surgery. Board certified orthopedic surgeons Dr. Steven Thomas and Dr. Gregory Bigler receive patients from Las Vegas, Nevada, and nearby areas for the treatment of shoulder tendonitis.

If you would like to schedule an appointment or learn more about the Knee and Shoulder Institute procedures & treatments performed by Las Vegas, Nevada board certified surgeons Steven C. Thomas, MD and Gregory T. Bigler, MD. call (702) 933-9393; Physical Therapy (702) 933-9393.

Proximal Humerus Growth Plate Fracture | Las Vegas Orthopedic SurgeryA growth plate fracture in case of children occurs at the end of a bone before the bone has fully matured from cartilage to hard bone. A proximal humerus fracture occurs in the upper arm, close to the shoulder. Most of the young children with proximal humerus fracture can benefit from non-surgical treatment.

In other cases, surgical treatment may be advised to improvement alignment of the fracture and reduce the risk of malunion. Board certified orthopedic surgeons at Thomas & Bigler Knee & Shoulder Institute provide treatments for proximal humerus growth plate fracture to patients in Las Vegas, Nevada and surrounding communities in The Silver State.

 

Symptoms

Symptoms of proximal humerus growth plate fracture include sudden pain in the upper arm and shoulder at the time of injury. This is accompanied by quick swelling in the shoulder. The patient will find it difficult and painful to move the arm. In some cases, the shoulder joint may look deformed after the injury.  

 

Causes

A growth plate fracture is usually caused due to a fall or impact on the arm or shoulder. But in some cases, it may also occur because of overuse of the joint. Long bones such as the humerus typically grow from the ends. At each end there is a growth plate, which is the final part of the bone that hardens from cartilage. That makes it a more vulnerable area to injury.

Growth plate fractures most often occur in children and adolescents, and rarely in adults. The ligaments and other soft tissues surrounding the joint are stronger in a child than the soft bone is. In adults, on the other hand, the soft tissue is more susceptible to injury.

 

Treatment

If the surgeon suspects a fracture, they will take an x-ray or MRI to confirm the diagnosis and the extent of bone displacement. Conservative treatment may be followed if the injury is non-displaced. The patient will go through a period of immobilization to allow for healing. This will be followed by rehabilitation to regain full movement and strength.

If the two bones are misaligned or separate in a fracture, a surgery may become necessary. The goal of the surgery will be to realign the bones and fix them in the right place using wires or pins. Here again immobilization is essential, which will be followed by rehabilitation.

 

Surgical Options

Closed reduction surgery may be performed under anesthesia to create an acceptable alignment. But if the fracture continues to be relatively unstable, the surgeon might perform percutaneous pin fixation after a closed reduction. Pins are typically placed retrograde through the metaphysis and enter the humeral epiphysis. The surgeon may use buried smooth or threaded pins to reduce the incidence of pin site infections or pin migration.

An open reduction may be performed if an acceptable closed reduction is not possible. This is often performed using a standard axillary approach. Other possible approaches include a deltoid split and a deltopectoral approach. Most surgeons favor percutaneous pin fixation, or occasionally internal fixation, after open reduction to minimize future displacement.

Board certified orthopedic surgeons Dr. Steven Thomas and Dr. Gregory Bigler receive patients from Las Vegas, Nevada and nearby areas for proximal humerus fracture treatment.

If you would like to schedule an appointment or learn more about the Knee and Shoulder Institute procedures & treatments performed by Las Vegas, Nevada board certified surgeons Steven C. Thomas, MD and Gregory T. Bigler, MD. call (702) 933-9393; Physical Therapy (702) 933-9393.

Shoulder Subluxation | Las Vegas Orthopedic Surgeons | Shoulder SurgeryWhen the shoulder partially dislocates, shoulder subluxation or shoulder instability may occur. The large range of movement in the shoulder makes it vulnerable to dislocation. Shoulder subluxation may be associated with pain or dead arm sensation. In some cases, the subluxation may not be painful, but may hamper the performance of certain daily activities or sports.

Shoulder subluxation can happen in one direction, such as anterior instability or posterior instability, or even in multiple directions. Anterior instability is the most common form in shoulder subluxation because the joint capsule is at its weakest at the front of the joint.

Board certified orthopedic surgeons at the Thomas & Bigler Shoulder & Knee Institute provide treatments for shoulder instability to patients in Las Vegas, Nevada and other suburbs and cities in the southeast part of the state.

 

Causes

Shoulder subluxation may occur due to a number of reasons. If the joint surfaces are shaped slightly differently, the joint may not be as stable compared to people who have normal joint anatomy. Shoulder instability may be caused due to:

  • Trauma (traumatic instability): This often occurs because of a specific accident or injury which damages the structures that provide stability
  • Old injury: Sometimes an old injury that weakens the capsule may cause instability, which is called post traumatic instability
  • Joint Laxity (atraumatic instability): This may occur because of anatomical abnormalities, hyper mobility, or muscle weakness certain conditions, including pregnancy
  • Acute or chronic instability: A traumatic injury occurring on an already lax joint may create chronic instability

 

Diagnosis

The orthopedic surgeon will perform several tests to determine the exact type of shoulder instability that the patient may have. They will evaluate the patient’s detailed medical history to try to understand the reasons behind this occurrence. The surgeon will also determine whether the patient has a condition that caused them to have lax ligaments throughout the body, which is known as hyper mobility.

 

Treatment

The surgeon will usually recommend a strengthening program to help the patient develop the muscles around the shoulder which are responsible for stabilizing the joint. A specific type of electrotherapy may be performed to help identify the muscles that are not functioning correctly. A tiny electric current to make the muscle tingle will help the patient to train the muscles more efficiently.

In some cases of shoulder instability, such as traumatic instability, if conservative treatment approaches do not work, the surgeon may have no other option but to perform a surgery. The surgeon will have several techniques available to improve the joint laxity at the shoulder. But this will have to be followed by a comprehensive rehabilitation program to ensure that the patient does not lose any joint movement.

Arthroscopy is nowadays more commonly used to determine the precise cause of shoulder subluxation. This is a minimally invasive procedure where the patient is administered an anaesthetic, and a small fiber optic camera is introduced to the joint to examine the underlying structures and assess the damage that could be repaired with surgery in a less invasive and targeted manner.

Judicious, responsible, and board certified plastic surgeons Dr. Steven Thomas and Dr. Gregory Bigler receive patients from Las Vegas, Nevada and nearby areas for shoulder subluxation treatment.

If you would like to schedule an appointment or learn more about the Knee and Shoulder Institute procedures & treatments performed by Las Vegas, Nevada board certified surgeons Steven C. Thomas, MD and Gregory T. Bigler, MD. call (702) 933-9393; Physical Therapy (702) 933-9393.

Bruised Collarbone | Las Vegas Orthopedic Surgeons | Shoulder SurgeryA bruised collarbone, clinically known as a clavicle contusion, occurs following a direct impact to the collar bone at the front of the shoulder or chest.

The condition involves bruising of the skin and the underlying tissue at the collarbone or the clavicle due to direct trauma. The contusions cause bleeding, and the blood infiltrates the soft tissue, tendons, and muscles.

A bruised collarbone often occurs along with an injury to the sternum or the breastbone and shoulder joint. Fabulous, perspicacious, and board certified orthopedic surgeons at Thomas & Bigler Knee & Shoulder Institute provide treatments for bruised collarbone to patients in Las Vegas, Nevada and surrounding locations.

 

Causes

In many cases, the bruised collarbone occurs due to a direct trauma to the clavicle. The injury is typically seen in contact sports such as football, hockey, wrestling, and basketball. While the injury commonly occurs during sports activities, it can also occur in other cases involving a fall. It can also develop due to a heavy object falling directly on to the shoulder area.

 

Symptoms

Common symptoms of a bruised collarbone include:

  • Swelling at the site of injury
  • Palpable tenderness in the injured tissue
  • A sensation of firmness when pressure is applied over the injured area
  • Skin discoloration at the injured site
  • In cases of severe injury, restriction of shoulder motion could be in play

If the patient experiences any of these symptoms, they should promptly seek medical attention. Early diagnosis and treatment will prevent the collarbone injury from worsening.

 

Diagnosis

To diagnose a clavicle contusion, the orthopedic surgeon will evaluate the patient’s history and perform a thorough physical exam of the injured area. They may also perform imaging studies in the form of x-rays of the collarbone to assess the extent of damage.

 

Treatment

A bruised collarbone is usually treated with a conservative approach starting with PRICE therapy. The patient should take sufficient rest and refrain from engaging in any form of sport activity. Frequent application of ice will help to calm down the pain and inflammation in the first one to two days.

It is beneficial to immobilize the arm with the use of a sling because it will take any type of pressure off the collarbone. The surgeon may also prescribe pain meds and NSAIDs to provide relief from the pain. If the surgeon suspects a fracture, they will take an x-ray to make the correct diagnosis. In case of a simple clavicle contusion, complete healing will usually occur in about two weeks.

When a fracture is suspected, the surgeon may also check the AC joint along with the collarbone to determine if any disruption of ligaments has occurred in that area. The surgeon will ensure that the pulse in the injured hand is strong and there is no change of sensation to rule out blood vessel or nerve injury.

Patients in Las Vegas, Nevada and other communities and towns in this region of the southwest have an opportunity to receive treatments for a bruised collarbone from board certified plastic surgeons Dr. Steven Thomas and Dr. Gregory Bigler.

If you would like to schedule an appointment or learn more about the Knee and Shoulder Institute procedures & treatments performed by Las Vegas, Nevada board certified surgeons Steven C. Thomas, MD and Gregory T. Bigler, MD. call (702) 933-9393; Physical Therapy (702) 933-9393.