Adhesive capsulitis, commonly known as frozen shoulder, is condition that restricts the shoulder joint movement and causes pain. A frozen shoulder will go through three phases: a freezing phase, where the joint becomes tight; a stiff phase, where shoulder movement gets significantly curtailed; and a thawing phase, where mobility improves and pain begins to subside.

Board certified orthopedic surgeons at the Thomas & Bigler Knee & Shoulder Institute provide treatments for frozen shoulder to patients in Las Vegas, Nevada and towns and suburbs in this section of The Battle Born State.

 

Symptoms

Painful (Freezing) Phase

In this phase, a gradual start of aching in the shoulder will occur. The pain will be diffused and is likely to worsen at night, making it difficult for the patient to lie down on the affected side. This painful phase may last from two to nine months.

 

Stiffening (Frozen) Phase

Stiffening will start happening in the shoulder joint in this phase. The shoulder pain may continue, and the patient may find it difficult to perform normal daily tasks. If treatment is neglected, shoulder muscles may begin to waste away. The symptoms in this phase may persist for about four months to a year.

 

Thawing Phase

In this phase, the frozen shoulder symptoms will start improving. Patient will be able to extend their range of movement and experience gradual pain reduction. Stiffness can ease for some time, but pain may re-emerge later. The thawing phase may last for about five months to a year.

 

Treatment

An orthopedic surgeon can provide timely treatment to ensure that severe stiffness is avoided. The patient should be prepared to follow the surgeon’s recommendation for a rehab program. Shoulder movements should be continued, even though the small and pendular. Mobility exercises and movement activity should only be done under the supervision of a qualified therapist.

Orthopedic surgeon’s first goal will be to try and manage frozen shoulder with conservative treatments. Surgery should only be a last option. The patient should arrange for physical therapy and a scientifically designed course of exercises in order to help maintain mobility and flexibility in the shoulder.

NSAIDs or steroidal drugs may be prescribed to treat inflammation in the shoulder joint. If the pain is acute, the surgeon may perform a steroidal injection directly into the joint. However, if inflammation does not diminish, surgery may be the last option left.

Once a conservative treatment or a surgery is completed, the rehabilitation efforts will begin. The patient should take care to pursue rehab only under professional supervision and guidance.

 

Surgery

Arthroscopic capsular release is the most common technique to perform surgery to treat a frozen shoulder. This procedure is performed using the keyhole surgery technique. The thickened shoulder capsule gets divided with this treatment for easy release.

Patients should note that a surgical procedure will have to be followed by a scientific rehabilitation program. The patient should be prepared to follow it well. Board certified orthopedic surgeons Dr. Steven Thomas and Dr. Gregory Bigler receive patients from Las Vegas, Nevada and nearby areas.

If you would like to schedule an appointment or learn more about the Knee and Shoulder Institute procedures & treatments performed by Las Vegas, Nevada board certified surgeons Steven C. Thomas, MD and Gregory T. Bigler, MD. call (702) 933-9393; Physical Therapy (702) 933-9393.

An AC joint separation is an injury to the ligament that holds the acromioclavicular (AC) joint together at the top of the shoulder. A common cause of this injury is a fall onto an outstretched arm. The severity of this joint sprain can from grade 1 to grade 6. Timely treatment and support to the joint is vital to avoid shoulder deformity and other long term problems.

Symptoms may include pain at the end of the collar bone on the top of the shoulder. Pain will worsen when trying to move the arm overhead and there is often swelling. A deformity may be noticed in more severe injuries in the form of an obvious lump on top of the shoulder joint.

Sagacious, profound, and board certified orthopedic surgeons at the Thomas & Bigler Knee and Shoulder Institute provide treatments for AC joint separation to patients in Las Vegas, Nevada, and surrounding locations.

 

Treatment

In case of an AC joint injury, the immediate step should be to provide first aid and apply the PRICE principles of rest, ice, compression and elevation. It is important to apply ice therapy and compression wrap as soon as possible to mitigate pain and swelling. The shoulder should be immobilized by wearing a sling to take the weight of the arm.

The surgeon may prescribe NSAIDs to treat pain and inflammation, while they evaluate the extent of injury. Ultrasound for minor injuries or TENS for pain relief may be used in more severe cases.

 

AC Joint Taping

An AC joint can fix and support the joint into the correct position to assist with healing. Taping may be needed for two to three weeks. The first step should be to apply two or three strips of 2.5 cm zinc oxide tape over the shoulder top that covers the AC joint. This will create an anchor for the support strip.

The surgeon would then pass a support strip of tape from the front of the shoulder, down the side of the arm applying tension to the tape. Thereafter, they will pass it below the elbow and back up to the top. This support strip will help pull the AC joint down. The support strip will then be secured with an elastic adhesive bandage. Finally, they will trim the lower part of the support taping away to finish.

The patient should gradually perform shoulder exercises recommended for AC joint sprain rehabilitation as pain improves.

 

Surgery

If the AC joint injury is graded as grade 1, 2 or 3, surgery is often avoided and more conservative treatment approaches can be adopted. However, if a grade 3 sprain fails to respond to conservative treatment, or the injury is of grade 4, 5 or 6, the patient will typically require surgery.  

If the patient does not seek timely treatment for AC joint separation, or allows the healing to occur out of place, it could increase the wear and tear on the joint, causing future problems. Board certified orthopedic surgeons Dr. Steven Thomas and Dr. Gregory Bigler provide AC Joint injury treatments to patients in Las Vegas, Nevada, and other towns and neighborhoods in this region of the southwest.

If you would like to schedule an appointment or learn more about the Knee and Shoulder Institute procedures & treatments performed by Las Vegas, Nevada board certified surgeons Steven C. Thomas, MD and Gregory T. Bigler, MD. call (702) 933-9393; Physical Therapy (702) 933-9393.

A dislocated shoulder is a traumatic and painful injury, typically caused due to a fall or during contact sports. In a dislocated shoulder condition, the upper arm bone will move away from its normal position along with damage to the surrounding muscles, tendons and ligaments.

A shoulder dislocated requires prompt medical attention. A full rehabilitation program is essential if the athlete is to avoid re-injuring the shoulder. Profound, dedicated, and board certified orthopedic surgeons at the Bigler Knee & Shoulder Institute provide treatments for dislocated shoulder to patients in Las Vegas, Nevada, and surrounding communities.

 

Symptoms

The patient will experience sudden severe pain at the time of injury. Bruising and swelling will develop later. The patient may feel the shoulder is popping out of the joint and the injured side will often look different or slightly lower than the other side. The patient will typically avoid moving or turning the arm outwards. If any nerve or blood vessel damage has occurred, the patient may experience a sensation of pins and needles, numbness or discoloration through the arm to the hand.

 

Causes

A dislocated shoulder is often caused by a fall onto an outstretched arm, twisting or impact to the shoulder. The dislocation takes place when the head of the humerus bone pops out of the shoulder joint.

They are usually either posterior where the head of the upper arm bone or humerus dislocates out of the back of the joint or more commonly anterior where it pops out forwards. The large range of movement available in the shoulder joint makes it particularly vulnerable to injury.

 

Treatment

To protect the shoulder joint from further damage, once an injury occurs, the patient should not move the shoulder joint. If possible, the shoulder should be immobilized in a sling. Ice packs can be used to improve pain and swelling. Ice therapy can be repeated every hour initially.

 

Reduction

Reduction is a form of treatment that involves putting the dislocated humerus bone back into the joint. Reduction should only be performed by a fully trained medical professional. The orthopedic surgeon may seek an x-ray before reduction to rule out any small fractures. For active adults below the age of 30, reduction can be a very effective solution for shoulder dislocation.

 

Immobilization

The shoulder is typically immobilized in a sling in medial rotation with the arm across the body until the tissues have healed. Mobility and strength of the shoulder will be restored after a comprehensive rehab process. The shoulder may be immobilized in a string for a week following a reduction. In case of severe tissue damage, the duration of immobilization may be longer.

 

Surgery

If the shoulder dislocation recurs, or if the bones are fractured, the patient may require surgery. Surgery should ideally be performed as soon as possible after the injury. Several surgical techniques can be used to treat shoulder dislocation. The choice of technique will depend primarily on the patient’s lifestyle and activity.

 

Board certified orthopedic surgeons Dr. Steven Thomas and Dr. Gregory Bigler provide shoulder dislocation treatments to patients in Las Vegas, Nevada, and other cities and towns in The Battle Born State.

If you would like to schedule an appointment or learn more about the Knee and Shoulder Institute procedures & treatments performed by Las Vegas, Nevada board certified surgeons Steven C. Thomas, MD and Gregory T. Bigler, MD. call (702) 933-9393; Physical Therapy (702) 933-9393.

The glenoid labrum is a fibrous ring of tissue that is attached to the rim of the glenoid which is the shallow depression of the scapula or shoulder blade where the ball of the humerus or arm bone sits. The glenoid labrum increases the depth of the shoulder cavity, which helps improve the stability of the shoulder joint.

The glenohumeral ligaments, which secure the upper arm to the shoulder and shoulder capsule, attach to the glenoid labrum. If a tear in the glenoid labrum occurs due to an injury or repetitive use, it must be treated in a timely manner to prevent worsening of the injury.

Board certified orthopedic surgeons at the Thomas & Bigler Knee & Shoulder Institute provide treatments for glenoid labrum tear to patients in Las Vegas, Nevada and other neighborhoods and communities in this part of southwest.

 

Nature of Injury

The glenoid labrum tears typically occur due to repetitive overhead throwing, lifting or catching heavy objects below shoulder level. This injury may also occur when a person falls onto an outstretched arm. These tears can be categorized as either superior, towards to the upper end of the glenoid socket, or inferor towards to the lower end of the socket.

A superior injury is known as a SLAP lesion (superior labrum, anterior to posterior). It involves a tear of the rim above the middle of the socket that may also involve the biceps tendon.

A tear of the rim beneath the middle of the glenoid socket is called a Bankart lesion, which also involves the inferior glenohumeral ligament. In many cases, glenoid labrum tears may occur with other shoulder injuries, such as a shoulder dislocation.

 

Symptoms

Symptoms of a glenoid labrum tear include pain in the shoulder that is not localized to a particular point. Overhead activities tend to worsen this pain. If the arm is held behind the back, it may increase the pain.

Many patients will complain of instability and weakness in the shoulder with specific tenderness above the front of the shoulder. Pain may be reproduced on resisted flexion of the biceps or bending the elbow against resistance

 

Treatment

PRICE therapy is the first line of treatment for glenoid labrum injuries. The patient should give adequate rest to the injured site, and apply ice therapy to improve pain and inflammation. It is important to see an orthopedic surgeon, who may prescribe NSAIDs such as ibuprofen after assessing the patient’s condition as well as their health factors.

Most patients will require a comprehensive and gradual rehabilitation program to restore full function. It is important address any underlying causes that may have contributed to the injury, such as shoulder instability.

 

Surgery

If the injury is severe, causing instability, a surgery may have to be performed to restore full shoulder health. The surgery will aim to re-attach the labrum to the glenoid. Surgery is often necessary in case of Bankart lesions.


Following the surgery, the shoulder will have to be placed in a sling for about a month. Percipient, wonderful, and board certified orthopedic surgeons Dr. Steven Thomas and Dr. Gregory Bigler receive patients from Las Vegas, Nevada and other suburbs and cities in this region of the nation for shoulder injuries.

If you would like to schedule an appointment or learn more about the Knee and Shoulder Institute procedures & treatments performed by Las Vegas, Nevada board certified surgeons Steven C. Thomas, MD and Gregory T. Bigler, MD. call (702) 933-9393; Physical Therapy (702) 933-9393.

A tear to any of the four rotator cuff muscles in the shoulder is called a rotator cuff strain or tear. The injury is common in throwing and racket sports, and may range from mild to severe. The job of the rotator cuff is to rotate the arm at the shoulder and provider support around the joint.

Treatment in case of rotator cuff tears will begin by reducing pain and inflammation, followed by a comprehensive rehabilitation program including mobility and specific exercises to strength the muscles. Salient, dependable, and board certified orthopedic surgeons at the Thomas & Bigler Knee & Shoulder Institute provide treatments for rotator cuff tears to patients in Las Vegas, Nevada and surrounding locations in this area of the southwest.

 

Symptoms

Symptoms of a rotator cuff tear will include sudden pain in the shoulder, which may be accompanied by a feeling of tearing. The pain may radiate down into the arm.

Signs of shoulder impingement may occur where the tendon pinches between the ball and socket of the shoulder joint when moving the arm out over head height. Pain may worsen over time and weakness in the shoulder may progress to a point where the patient is unable to lift the arm up to the side.

 

PRICE Therapy

The basic first aid for a rotator cuff tear in the muscle or tendon involves rest and application of PRICE principles – protection, rest, ice, compression, and elevation. Ice or cold therapy should be applied quickly to stop the swelling, inflammation and pain from worsening. The patient can use ice therapy for 10 minutes every hour, reducing it to three to four times a day as pain mitigates.

For more severe rotator cuff injuries, a sling can sometimes be more useful. Once the acute phase has passed, the patient can begin mobility and strengthening exercises as long as no pain occurs. If the PRICE efforts do not help to eliminate the pain and restore the shoulder movement, the patient will require professional medical treatment.

 

Orthopedic Treatment

To start with, an orthopedic surgeon may prescribe pain relief and anti-inflammatory drugs to address a rotator cuff tear. The surgeon may order imaging studies such as x-rays or MRI to determine the exact diagnosis and rule out a fracture. Some patients may have to receive a steroid injection directly into the site of the problem to help improve inflammation and enable the patient to proceed with rehabilitation.

Once the pain is eliminated, the surgeon will recommend a full rehabilitation program including stretching and strengthening exercises. Shoulder massage, including cross friction massage, to the rotator cuff tendon can break the injury down to its acute stage to allow correct healing of the injury to occur.

Range of motion and mobility exercises in the shoulder joint should start as soon as these can be performed without any pain. The first priority is pendulum exercises, particularly if it is a severe tear or following surgery. Stellar, committed, and board certified orthopedic surgeons Dr. Steven Thomas and Dr. Gregory Bigler receive patients from Las Vegas, Nevada and nearby areas in this part of southeast Nevada for rotator cuff injury treatments and surgery.

If you would like to schedule an appointment or learn more about the Knee and Shoulder Institute procedures & treatments performed by Las Vegas, Nevada board certified surgeons Steven C. Thomas, MD and Gregory T. Bigler, MD. call (702) 933-9393; Physical Therapy (702) 933-9393.

A shoulder injury may be acute or chronic depending on when it is diagnosed and the duration for which the shoulder pain has persisted. An acute shoulder injury may occur by way of direct impact, overstretching of a muscle, tendon or ligament, overuse of a muscle or tendon, or twisting of the shoulder joint.

Outstanding, dedicated, and board certified orthopedic surgeons at the Thomas & Bigler Knee & Shoulder Institute provide treatments for shoulder pain to patients in Las Vegas, Nevada, and surrounding communities and cities in this part of The Silver State.

 

Glenoid Labrum Tear

The glenoid labrum refers to a fibrous ring of tissue that is attached to the rim of the glenoid shallow hole or socket of the shoulder blade where the ball of the humerus or arm bone sits.

 

Dislocated Shoulder

A dislocated shoulder is a common injury that is typically painful and traumatic. Contact sports or a fall are the common causes of this condition.

 

AC Joint Separation

An AC joint sprain or AC joint separation refers to an injury occurring in the ligament that holds the acromioclavicular joint together at the top of the shoulder. A fall onto an outstretched arm will often cause this injury.

 

Frozen Shoulder

Frozen shoulder, clinically known as adhesive capsulitis, refers to a condition that causes pain and restricts movement in the shoulder joint.

 

Shoulder Impingement Syndrome

Impingement syndrome is sometimes called swimmer’s shoulder or thrower’s shoulder. If the tendons of the rotator cuff become impinged as they pass through the shoulder joint, this condition may occur.

 

Winged Scapula

This is not an injury itself, but a symptom of another condition. It is where the shoulder blade protrudes out on the back, rather than laying flat against the back of the chest wall.

 

Deltoid Muscle Strain

An injured deltoid muscle can cause pain at the front, side or back of the shoulder.

 

Bruised Collarbone

A clavicle contusion, commonly known as a bruised collarbone, may occur due to a direct impact to the collar bone at the front of the chest or shoulder.

 

Shoulder Subluxation

Shoulder subluxation or shoulder instability is caused when partial dislocation of the shoulder occurs. The shoulder joint by its nature allows a large range of movement which means it is likely to be less stable.

 

Subscapularis Inflammation

The subscapularis is a strong muscle that rotates the arm inwards and is part of the rotator cuff group of muscles. A thrower may typically sustain this injury, which can be stubborn to treat.

 

Shoulder Tendonitis

This is a degenerative condition of any of the tendons surrounding the shoulder joint. It often occurs in the rotator cuff tendons, but may sometimes occur in the biceps and triceps tendons.

 

Posterior Shoulder Dislocation

This is a rare shoulder injury as most shoulder dislocations are anterior. A posterior dislocation of the shoulder occurs when the head of the humerus moves backwards out of the socket.

 

Shoulder Sprain

Damage to the shoulder ligaments or capsule that support the shoulder joint is called a shoulder sprain. It may be stretching of the fibers or partial to full tears of the ligaments or joint capsule.

Poignant, reliable, and board certified orthopedic surgeons Dr. Steven Thomas and Dr. Gregory Bigler receive patients from Las Vegas, Nevada and nearby areas across the horizon for shoulder pain.

If you would like to schedule an appointment or learn more about the Knee and Shoulder Institute procedures & treatments performed by Las Vegas, Nevada board certified surgeons Steven C. Thomas, MD and Gregory T. Bigler, MD. call (702) 933-9393; Physical Therapy (702) 933-9393.

Lateral knee pain refers to the pain that occurs on the outside of the knee. It develops gradually, unlike an acute knee joint or ligament injury. Iliotibial band friction syndrome and lateral cartilage injuries are two of the most common causes of outside knee pain.

 

Iliotibial Band Syndrome

Iliotibial band syndrome refers to inflammation of the Iliotibial band on the outside of the knee when it rubs against the outside of the knee joint. Symptoms include pain occurring on the outside of the knee, which can get progressively worse. The athlete will be required to rest for a period of time until the symptoms dissipate.

 

Lateral Meniscus Tear

Lateral meniscus tear refers to an injury to the semi circular cartilage on the outside of the knee joint. Pain and tenderness around the outside surface of the knee will occur in this case. The knee joint is cushioned and supported by two crescent shaped cartilage menisci. These can be injured due to a traumatic injury or twisting as well as gradual degeneration.

 

Peroneal Nerve Contusion

The peroneal nerve is a branch of the sciatic nerve which runs down the outside of the lower leg, serving the peroneal muscles which help pull the foot upwards and inwards. Tingling and numbness in the lower leg is a common symptom, and it is often caused by a blow to the outside of the knee.

 

Proximal Tibiofibular Joint Dislocation

In many cases, dislocation of the proximal tibiofibular joint occurs when the athlete sustains an impact or falls with their knee in a fully bent position. It is an injury to the joint at the top of the shin where the two shin bones meet at the knee.

 

Less Common Causes of the Lateral Knee Pain

Osteoarthritis

Osteoarthritis of the knee refers to the wear and tear on the knee joint. In a case where this condition occurs in the lateral compartment or outside of the knee, the patient may experience a deep aching pain in the inner knee that worsens after exercise.

In the morning, the patient may often suffer from stiffness in the knee joint. But this can reduce with movement as the joint produces lubricating synovial fluid. The patient may experience knee swelling or a cracking or clicking sound when moving the knee.

 

Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome

Patellofemoral pain syndrome typically causes pain at the front of the knee. However, it may also cause pain on the outside of the knee as the outside of the patella rubs on the bone underneath. The knee will often have swelling, and pain will emerge gradually over time.

 

Biceps Femoris Tendonitis

Biceps femoris tendonitis refers to inflammation of one of the hamstring muscles at its point of attachment at the back and outside of the knee. It is marked by swelling and tenderness at the point where the bone and tendon attach. The patient may experience pain when bending the knee against resistance with stiffness after exercise and in the mornings.

Astute, marvelous, and board certified orthopedic surgeons Dr. Steven Thomas and Dr. Gregory Bigler receive patients from Las Vegas, Nevada and other neighborhoods and suburbs in The Sagebrush State for outside knee injuries.

If you would like to schedule an appointment or learn more about the Knee and Shoulder Institute procedures & treatments performed by Las Vegas, Nevada board certified surgeons Steven C. Thomas, MD and Gregory T. Bigler, MD. call (702) 933-9393; Physical Therapy (702) 933-9393.

Inside Knee Pain

Inside knee pain or medial knee pain refers to the pain that may occur on the inside of the knee. As opposed to a sudden acute knee injury, this pain usually emerges gradually. In many cases, the patient may not be sure of what this injury may be, and they should be aware of its common symptoms.

Although pain on the inside of the knee is often caused due to an acute injury occurring as a result of sudden trauma, but it can appear gradually over time with overuse and poor biomechanics. The orthopedic surgeon will first evaluate the underlying cause of the medial knee injury and assess its severity in order to recommend an appropriate treatment.

The Thomas & Bigler Knee & Shoulder Institute, led by board certified orthopedic surgeons, provides state of the art treatments for medial knee injury and various other procedures to patients in Las Vegas, Nevada, and surrounding communities and suburbs in this region of the Battle Born State.

Osteoarthritis of the Knee

Osteoarthritis of the knee or wear and tear on the knee joint is one of the common causes of inside knee pain. A customized pain management program and therapy may be recommended by the surgeon to patients suffering from this condition.

Synovial Plica Irritation

The synovial plica refers to a synovial fold that is present along the inside of the knee cap. This can become the cause of discomfort and pain for a patient. In some cases, this pain may be misdiagnosed or confused with patellofemoral pain syndrome because the symptoms are quite similar.

Pes Anserine Tendinopathy – Bursitis

Pes anserine tendonitis refers to inflammation of a tendon on the inside of the knee. A small fluid sac or bursa can also become inflamed and cause pain.

Medial Ligament Sprain

An MCL injury or a medial ligament sprain refers to a tear of the ligament on the inside of the knee. This typically occurs because of twisting or direct impact. Injuries of the medial ligament are common in contact sports as well as martial arts. These injuries may sometimes occur even in everyday life through twists and falls of the knee joint. A severe MCL sprain may also occur with a cartilage meniscus tear.

Medial Cartilage Meniscus Injury

A torn meniscus refers to a tear that may occur in the semi circular cartilage in the knee joint. It can create pain on the inside of the knee. Contact sports, direct impact or twisting are common causes of this injury, but older athletes may also suffer from this condition through gradual degeneration. Treatment will depend on the severity of the injury, and may sometimes require surgery.

Knee Contusion

A bruised knee, which is clinically called a knee contusion, may occur due to an impact on the inside of the knee. This injury particularly occurs when the knee hits against something hard, such as a club or a ball. A contusion or a bruise may sometimes involve damage to any of the soft tissues or bone.

Sagacious, tremendous, and board certified orthopedic surgeons Dr. Steven Thomas and Dr. Gregory Bigler receive patients from Las Vegas, Nevada, and other cities and communities across the landscape for medial knee injuries.

If you would like to schedule an appointment or learn more about the Knee and Shoulder Institute procedures & treatments performed by Las Vegas, Nevada board certified surgeons Steven C. Thomas, MD and Gregory T. Bigler, MD. call (702) 933-9393; Physical Therapy (702) 933-9393.

Front Knee Pain 

Front or anterior knee pain refers to the pain occurring at the front of the knee, including the kneecap or patella. Patients may not be sure what is causing them front knee pain, but two of the common causes of this pain are patellofemoral pain and patella tendinitis or Jumper’s knee.

It can sometimes become difficult to distinguish between the two types of pain, and on occasion, these two conditions may occur at the same time. Fabulous, focused, and board certified orthopedic surgeons at the Thomas & Bigler Knee & Shoulder Institute provide treatments for anterior knee pain to patients in Las Vegas, Nevada, and surrounding locations in this area of the country.

Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome

Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome (PFPS) is also known by other names such as as runners knee, chondromalacia patellae, anterior knee pain and patellofemoral joint syndrome. This generic term describes patella pain at the front of the knee.

Sinding-Larsen-Johansson Lesion

Sinding-Larsen-Johansson Lesion or syndrome is one of a group of injuries known as osteochondroses. This condition typically causes knee pain in children. Osgood’s Schlatter Disease is another similar injury. It is a chronic stress injury occurring at the bottom of the kneecap.

Jumpers Knee

Jumpers knee or patellar tendonitis occurs from overuse of the knee. It causes pain in the front of the knee, localized at a point towards the lower part of the kneecap. Too much running, jumping, or repetitive strain can cause inflammation or degeneration of the patella tendon.

Osgood Schlatters Disease

Osgood Schlatter disease or Osgood Schlatter lesion is a knee pain commonly occurring in children in the age group of 10 to 15 years. The condition was named after two physicians in 1903, Dr. Robert Osgood and Dr. Carl Schlatter.

Chondromalacia Patella

Chondromalacia patella (CMP) refers to damage occurring to the articular cartilage, which is the smooth hard cartilage under the kneecap.

Housemaids Knee

Housemaids Knee, clinically known as prepatellar bursitis or knee bursitis, refers to a swelling of the bursa. A small sack of fluid may occur at the front of the knee.

Patellofemoral Instability

In case of patellofemoral instability, the patient typically experiences the sensation of their kneecap giving away or feeling loose on movement of the knee.

Quadriceps Tendinopathy

Pain and inflammation of the quadriceps tendon may occur due to overuse of the knee. The tendon inserts into the top of the kneecap, and over a period of time it can result in degeneration of the tendon.

Infrapatella Bursitis

A bursa refers to a small sac of fluid, which performs the function of lubricating the movement between tendons and bone. Several bursas are present around the knee, which can sometimes become painful and inflamed.

Fat Pad Impingement

The infrapatella fat pad is also known as Hoffa’s pad. It is a soft tissue that lies beneath the kneecap which can get impinged causing knee pain.

When a patient experiences persistent or severe knee pain, they should consult with an orthopedic surgeon and receive appropriate treatment. Judicious, accomplished, and board certified orthopedic surgeons Dr. Steven Thomas and Dr. Gregory Bigler receive patients from Las Vegas, Nevada, and other suburbs and communities in this area of Nevada for knee and shoulder related injuries.

If you would like to schedule an appointment or learn more about the Knee and Shoulder Institute procedures & treatments performed by Las Vegas, Nevada board certified surgeons Steven C. Thomas, MD and Gregory T. Bigler, MD. call (702) 933-9393; Physical Therapy (702) 933-9393.

Knee Injuries

A sudden twisting action or trauma may sometimes lead to an acute knee injury. Treatment is essential to prevent the acute knee injury from progressing to chronic or more complex knee injuries. Board certified orthopedic surgeons at Thomas & Bigler Knee & Shoulder Institute provide treatments for acute knee injuries to patients in Las Vegas, Nevada, and surrounding communities in The Sagebrush State.

ACL Sprain

Anterior Cruciate Ligament injury or ACL may commonly occur in contact sports. ACL tears often occur along with damage to other structures within the knee, such as the cartilage or collateral ligaments.

Hamstring Tendon Rupture

If the hamstring tendons insert into the back of the knee, it can cause a full or partial rupture of the tendons.

Medial Ligament Sprain

A medial ligament sprain or MCL injury involves torn ligament inside the knee, often due to direct impact or a twist. These injuries can occur in contact sports as well as in everyday life through falls and twists of the knee joint.

Lateral Knee Ligament Sprain

This involves a knee ligament tear on the outside of the knee. The most likely cause is a direct blow to the inside of the knee.

Posterior Cruciate Ligament Injury

The posterior cruciate ligament is vital to provide stability to the knee and prevent it from bending back the wrong way.

Knee Contusion

This refers to a bruised knee, which may occur due to a fall directly onto the knee or something hard hitting the knee. Treatment will vary depending on the severity of the bruise.

Medial Meniscus Tear

A torn meniscus is a tear to the semi circular cartilage in the knee joint. This injury commonly occurs through direct impact in contact sports or twisting. Severe tears may require surgery.

Unhappy Triad

The unhappy triad of the knee refers to a severe injury involving damage to three of the four major knee ligaments.

Coronary Ligament Sprain

The symptoms of this injury are similar to that of cartilage meniscus injury. The symptoms often occur in conjunction with lateral ligament injuries.

Biceps Femoris Tendon Avulsion

The Biceps Femoris is one of the three hamstring muscles. A fracture involves the tendon pulling away from the bone.

Acute Patella Injury

An injury to the kneecap or patella from a fall onto the knee or a direct blow may cause this condition. Sometimes a fracture of the patella may also occur.

Osteochondral Knee Fracture

An Osteochondral knee fracture involves a tear of the cartilage which covers the end of a bone within a joint. This injury typically occurs in association with other injuries such as ACL tears.

Knee Sprain

If an injury or damage occurs to one of the four ligaments that support the knee, it is called a knee sprain.

Articular Cartilage Injury

Damage to the cartilage that lines the bone ends is known as an articular cartilage injury.

Dislocated Knee

When the femur or thigh bone and the tibia or shin bone are moved apart, it called a dislocated knee.

Patella Dislocation

The patella can dislocate outside of its normal position, usually round the outside of the knee.

Sagacious, stellar, and board certified orthopedic surgeons Dr. Steven Thomas and Dr. Gregory Bigler receive patients from Las Vegas, Nevada and nearby areas for treatment of knee injuries.

If you would like to schedule an appointment or learn more about the Knee and Shoulder Institute procedures & treatments performed by Las Vegas, Nevada board certified surgeons Steven C. Thomas, MD and Gregory T. Bigler, MD. call (702) 933-9393; Physical Therapy (702) 933-9393.